Simplicity 4109 Jacket in Railroad Denim

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Simplicity 4109 Jacket in Railroad Denim

Hi, everyone.  I’m excited to share this jacket with you today now that I have pictures!

Simplicity 4109 Jacket in Railroad Denim

Today’s project is Simplicity 4109, an out-of-print Built by Wendy/Built by You sewing pattern from 2006.

Simplicity 4109 Jacket in Railroad Denim

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Simplicity 4109 Jacket in Railroad Denim

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Simplicity 4109 Jacket in Railroad Denim

I found my copy on Etsy.  What drew me in were the cool front pockets on View A and the potential to create different looks based on your fabric and hardware choices.  It looked like a pattern that would make a great chore jacket or jean jacket.  Originally I had planned to make this last year, maybe in an olive green cotton twill, but that fabric became my recent pants overfitting drama.  Instead, I finally made this pattern from some railroad denim I got this past summer at Field’s Fabrics in Holland, Michigan.

Simplicity 4109 Jacket in Railroad Denim

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Simplicity 4109 Jacket in Railroad Denim

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Simplicity 4109 Jacket in Railroad Denim

The label said it was 100% cotton as far as I can remember, but there is definitely some stretch, even if only good mechanical stretch.  I would say this is probably a midweight.  I traced View A with a 16/18 bust, 18/20 waist, and 20 hip.  I also did a major broad back adjustment.

Simplicity 4109 Jacket in Railroad Denim

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Simplicity 4109 Jacket in Railroad Denim

The pattern instructions were really good, and this was an enjoyable project to make.  I didn’t have topstitching thread, so I chose to use a triple stitch with a normal weight thread.  If I had planned ahead a bit more I could have ordered topstitching thread in green from Wawak, but my local fabric stores didn’t have any (and I didn’t plan ahead), so regular weight was what it had to be!

Simplicity 4109 Jacket in Railroad Denim

Let’s talk pattern details.  The most intriguing part of this pattern was the front pockets.  I really like them, but I did change a few minor things.  For some reason, the top pocket wasn’t supposed to have a real buttonhole–you were just supposed to sew a button to the flap, which seems silly.  I wanted the real deal, so I made a buttonhole in the flap and installed a jeans tack instead of a button.

Simplicity 4109 Jacket in Railroad Denim

Because my fabric was kind of stretchy, I also sewed twill tape to the inside of the lower pocket opening, doing a decorative zigzag on the outside to hold it in place.  I was hoping this would keep the pocket openings from stretching out.

Simplicity 4109 Jacket in Railroad Denim

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Simplicity 4109 Jacket in Railroad Denim

I also added bartacks at the corners of the pockets and the lower pocket opening because I like that look.

Simplicity 4109 Jacket in Railroad Denim

I did a double line of topstitching on the top of the flap, even though the directions only say to do one.  If you do a double line, you need to be very careful not to sew the top of the pocket underneath the flap shut.  I also did a little extra topstitching on the sleeve vents because I thought it would look nice.

For some secret fun, I added Rifle Paper Co. rayon scraps to the insides of the pocket flaps as well as using bias tape from the same fabric to make a hanging loop and to finish some of my inner seams.  I did an ugly but effective version of bias bound seams; however I think Hong Kong seams would have been better.

Simplicity 4109 Jacket in Railroad Denim

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Simplicity 4109 Jacket in Railroad Denim

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Simplicity 4109 Jacket in Railroad Denim

I had a lot of fun playing with the stripes on this jacket.  I tried to take every opportunity to flip things around, and I’m really happy with how it turned out.

Simplicity 4109 Jacket in Railroad Denim

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Simplicity 4109 Jacket in Railroad Denim

I thought I would like it, but I REALLY like it.  It’s got a good amount of ease, so you can easily wear a sweater underneath (nice since I finished this just as the weather got even colder).  I also think this pattern could be a good candidate for a lining as it would be easy to hide the edges under the facings.

Simplicity 4109 Jacket in Railroad Denim

You should know that I have very little experience with lining things, so that’s a guess based on near total inexperience.  🙂  What got me thinking about it is these very inspiring denim jackets made by Ginew that are lined with an exclusive Pendleton wool.  They’re beautiful!

I find denim very inspiring and I also really like workwear.  There are so many details that are both interesting and functional in work clothes, not to mention you can do actual work in them.  I may not be a farmer or a construction worker, but I like having clothes that I don’t have to worry about messing up and that wear beautifully as they age.

Simplicity 4109 Jacket in Railroad Denim

All that to say, I’m happy with this jacket.  I definitely recommend this pattern, and could see making it again if I found a fabric that was inspiring.

 

16 responses »

  1. I first found your blog when searching for projects on Simplicity 1696 pants so I could see what it looks like in real life. I really liked your pink and grey ones. I am new to sewing in my midlife and realized I enjoy it. This jacket looks fun. I had a railroad denim dress as a kid, so this brings back memories.

    Is that an antique clothes hanger? I got a bunch from my Grandma and like the simplicity of wood and metal. Some she knitted covers for some so they are padded.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks for reading my blog, Laura! I really appreciate your comment. Those are antique hangers. I got them at Brimfield, I think, or maybe from my in-laws. I realized I needed something simple and nice looking for blog photos. The ones from your grandma sound nice. I hope you’re enjoying sewing! Did you ever make any pants from Simplicity 1696?

      Like

      • I have been working on my muslin for the Simplicity 1696. I bought two curtain panels from Goodwill for $3 to go as cheap as possible for my sample try. This is my first time sewing from a pattern. : 0 I’ve had a couple of places where I got a little stuck, but think I figured it out. I now need to try the pants on and mark any changes on the pattern. The process has been fun and I can’t wait to make some actual pants. I am excited to try some fun materials/colors (specifically ripstop cotton for the warmer weather).

        Liked by 1 person

      • Way to go! I bet the pants will be great. I remember it taking awhile to get used to sewing from patterns, but each project gets easier as far as reading and understanding them.

        Your muslin plan sounds really smart. I never feel like making muslins, but I’m always so glad when I do. I’m sure your final product will be better for it. Ripstop Cotton sounds like a great choice for summer, plus Simplicity 1696 is a great pattern. Yay! You can do it!

        Like

  2. Unbelievable! Beyond a professional job on this jacket. I love everything about it! Fits you beautifully, fabric choice excellent (reminds me of home), superior finishes and I really like the pattern choice (those pockets are so cool).

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I love everything about this – railroad denim, pocket flap lining, Hong Kong finish, interesting and functional pockets. I have this pattern and never even noticed the pockets on the long version because I was focused on the cropped one. AND I have some railroad denim marinating in my stash. I am so excited I can barely sit still. I may have to go home “sick!”

    Liked by 1 person

  4. This is a fantastic jacket. Those pockets are great – but I agree you need the buttons on the top pocket. I love all the little hidden details and the fabric is beautiful. A great make all around.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. You did such a great job! I would have been intimidated by the fabric but yours is beautifully executed. I agree that it’s such a joy to have clothing that is functional and ages well.
    Did you make your bias tape with a bias tape maker? Also, did you sew each line of topstitching individually? They’re so perfectly parallel, that it almost looks like a double needle did it. Happy New Year!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you so much! I did make my bias tape with a bias tape maker. It’s rayon, so I starched it and used a tutorial for continuous bias binding (I think). I got inexpensive bias tape makers from Amazon.

      I did sew each line of topstitching individually. I found a place to line my seam up with on my presser foot as I sewed the first line, and then a place to line the first topstitching up with on my presser foot for the second pass to keep things even. I tried to space them a quarter inch apart. Hopefully that makes sense. Thanks so much for the compliments! Happy new year to you too!

      Like

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