Patagonia-Inspired Vest in Insulated Carhartt Canvas and Polartec Fleece

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Patagonia-Inspired Vest in Insulated Carhartt Canvas and Polartec Fleece

My vest is finally done!!! I’m so excited to share it with you!

Patagonia-Inspired Vest in Insulated Carhartt Canvas and Polartec Fleece

This vest began several years ago, when I saw a cool Patagonia outerwear vest with a Western-style yoke in a surprising color combination at Nordstrom. (Nordstrom is a great place to “shop” for inspiration!) While I know that Patagonia is a great company that produces clothes of excellent quality, it is not in my price range. So, I filed away the idea for later and moved on. (Sadly, I can’t find a picture of my inspiration vest in my files, but here are the ones that I looked at while planning this project–women’s, men’s.)

This past summer, while visiting family in Michigan, I went to Field’s Fabrics in Holland, MI, and saw this great Carhartt canvas insulated with Thinsulate.

Patagonia-Inspired Vest in Insulated Carhartt Canvas and Polartec Fleece
It’s funny that the name on the roll is spelled “Carhardt”, but if you look on the website at the link above, you’ll see it’s spelled correctly: “Carhartt”. Just a typo, not a knock-off!

I had seen it at the store on a previous trip, and always wished I had bought some, so this time I did. My initial idea? A winter snap-front skirt to wear over leggings. I love those short, insulated skirts for winter! My Mom looked at the fabric, though, and suggested making a vest. At first I ruled it out, but as I thought more and more about the idea, I realized that it was a good one. I would wear a vest more than a skirt and it would fit me longer if I sized it correctly. And I remembered that Patagonia vest from way back. That’s when I got excited.

Deciding on all the specifics of fabric and pattern and any tweaks I wanted to make took a long time. My fabrics were originally not very cozy (other than the insulated canvas) because I was going purely on colors that worked together, but eventually, with input from my family, I decided to use a beloved piece of wool for my yoke that I have had in my stash for I don’t know how long, just waiting for the right project. At that point, I needed to rethink my lining layer to make everything look good together. I found a cream colored Polartec 200 Thermal Pro curly fleece online at The Rain Shed that was on sale, and looked like it just might work. I ordered it with some pocket zippers and bit the bullet on the insane shipping cost (so expensive!) since the fabric itself was such a good price.

Patagonia-Inspired Vest in Insulated Carhartt Canvas and Polartec Fleece

The fabric was perfection with what I already had, but the hardware wasn’t quite there yet. I ditched my first zipper idea and ordered some metal ones with brass pulls from zipit on Etsy.

Patagonia-Inspired Vest in Insulated Carhartt Canvas and Polartec Fleece

I have used their zippers before, and they are pretty cool looking. Brass heavy duty snaps from Joann Fabrics completed my hardware search.

Patagonia-Inspired Vest in Insulated Carhartt Canvas and Polartec Fleece
If you try these, make sure you get a package with a setting tool (not pictured) if you don’t already have one.

For my pattern, I chose the Men’s Santiam Reversible Vest #102 from The Green Pepper Patterns.

Patagonia-Inspired Vest in Insulated Carhartt Canvas and Polartec Fleece

There is a women’s vest, but I was outside the size range, and it didn’t seem like a big deal to curve out the hips on the men’s one if necessary. Time to get started!

The goal? Create an outerwear vest with the Western yoke of the Patagonia example that would be large and roomy enough to fit over my bulkiest sweater and thickest fleece leggings or jeans. And make it cozy! In order to get the fit I wanted, I followed the pattern’s directions to take measurements over the clothes I wanted to wear the vest with. This put me at a chest and waist size XL, and a hip size 2XL.

To keep this post from getting too long, I’ll list out the tweaks I made to the pattern instead of talking through them. Here’s what I changed:

*created a yoke piece to attach to the outer layer of the vest, front and back

Patagonia-Inspired Vest in Insulated Carhartt Canvas and Polartec Fleece
Patagonia-Inspired Vest in Insulated Carhartt Canvas and Polartec Fleece

*graded the hips out to a larger size, which meant that the side of the handwarmer pockets needed to be reshaped, and the angle of the pocket zippers needed to change to mirror the angle of the hips

Patagonia-Inspired Vest in Insulated Carhartt Canvas and Polartec Fleece
The original pattern piece is in green marker; my alterations are in pencil

*created a longer back hem that curved down by tracing a vintage Woolrich puffer vest; this is also a feature on the Patagonia vests I linked to

Patagonia-Inspired Vest in Insulated Carhartt Canvas and Polartec Fleece
You can see the longer back extending down in this picture
Patagonia-Inspired Vest in Insulated Carhartt Canvas and Polartec Fleece
The vest from the back, fleece side out

*created a pattern piece for wool strips that would attach to the fleece; I planned to fuse interfacing to the wool strips, hoping that this would be a more stable option for the snaps to attach to rather than the fleece (I previously made a fleece cardigan using sew-in interfacing, and a few of the anorak snaps I used as closures pulled away from my fleece–I was hoping to prevent that here)

Patagonia-Inspired Vest in Insulated Carhartt Canvas and Polartec Fleece

*stay-stitched the yoke so nothing would stretch out

*flipped the directions so that my inner layer would have zipper pockets and my outer layer would have hand warmer pockets

Patagonia-Inspired Vest in Insulated Carhartt Canvas and Polartec Fleece
Zipper pockets; I gave the fleece around the zippers a tiny trim before calling it good
Patagonia-Inspired Vest in Insulated Carhartt Canvas and Polartec Fleece
Handwarmer pockets

*used leftover woven Supplex from this project for my zipper pockets and half of my handwarmer pockets rather than the canvas and fleece to reduce bulk

Patagonia-Inspired Vest in Insulated Carhartt Canvas and Polartec Fleece
Patagonia-Inspired Vest in Insulated Carhartt Canvas and Polartec Fleece

By the time I had decided on all these little details, I started to get nervous that I was going to forget something! I had already forgotten that the seam allowance on this pattern was 3/8″, and ended up creating the pattern for my wool strips with one side having a 3/8″ seam allowance and the other one having a 5/8″ seam allowance.

Before beginning anything, though, I had to prewash all my fabric, which included that insulated canvas. The canvas is quilted to a batting layer which has a scrim, but no additional fabric.

Patagonia-Inspired Vest in Insulated Carhartt Canvas and Polartec Fleece
Canvas, batting, and scrim, all quilted together; the scrim is a thin layer over the batting that helps stabilize and hold everything together

I didn’t want it to get messed up in the washer, so I basted an old sheet onto the back side, put a few safety pins in the middle to sort of pin-baste it, and threw it in the washer. Luckily, it worked! I just seam-ripped the sheet off after it was all done and saved it for another purpose.

Once I was ready to cut everything out…I had to stop. Just before cutting I realized (thankfully) that the brick quilting pattern on the canvas needed to be lined up as much as possible so the horizontal lines matched! I got things as close as I could. The quilting wasn’t always possible to line up perfectly, whether because of shrinkage from prewashing or because it wasn’t exact. I got it done, though, and then it was on to the Polartec fleece–but wait! This had a nap, which means it’s a directional fabric–you want the fleece to all lie in the proper direction! Back through the cobwebs of my memory floated the time I had accidentally cut curly fleece upside down for a sweatshirt project and had to recut it. Didn’t want to do that again! Ok. Fleece all cut out, it was on to the yoke. But I wanted that on the bias since it would look nice that way and–oh! The shoulders needed to be pattern matched!

Patagonia-Inspired Vest in Insulated Carhartt Canvas and Polartec Fleece
Decent pattern matching on the shoulder seam!

It was crazy. Every time I thought something would be straightforward, it wasn’t, but nevertheless, I’m so very thankful I realized those things before I cut all the layers out.

I think it’s fair to say I procrastinated a lot on this project. Any time I knew I would have to do something tricky or scary, I paused, but eventually I would forge ahead, hoping it would turn out all right. And luckily, it did. The pattern instructions were very good, and the vest was really interesting to sew. I used my regular sewing machine for construction and my serger for finishing seams, although you don’t need one. The instructions tell you to finish your seams with a zigzag stitch.

I completed this just in time for some really cold weather that came our way. And I love it!

Patagonia-Inspired Vest in Insulated Carhartt Canvas and Polartec Fleece
Patagonia-Inspired Vest in Insulated Carhartt Canvas and Polartec Fleece

Now don’t be fooled–this vest is a massive beast of winter. This is no lightweight indoor vest. It’s big and a little bit heavy, though not uncomfortably so.

Patagonia-Inspired Vest in Insulated Carhartt Canvas and Polartec Fleece
Patagonia-Inspired Vest in Insulated Carhartt Canvas and Polartec Fleece
Patagonia-Inspired Vest in Insulated Carhartt Canvas and Polartec Fleece

It has plenty of extra ease to go over my biggest sweater (just like I hoped!), and it’s so nice and warm. That collar can really keep out the wind, too!

Patagonia-Inspired Vest in Insulated Carhartt Canvas and Polartec Fleece
Patagonia-Inspired Vest in Insulated Carhartt Canvas and Polartec Fleece

Happily, it’s just what I wanted, and all the design and hardware choices really combined to make it look professional and rugged. And it’s reversible! Even the snaps!

Patagonia-Inspired Vest in Insulated Carhartt Canvas and Polartec Fleece
Patagonia-Inspired Vest in Insulated Carhartt Canvas and Polartec Fleece

Both the pattern and the snap pack mentioned that you can use the decorative snap caps on both sides to make your project reversible, so I tried it and it worked! Success!

Now I have one more unique garment that fits me just right for winter. Yay!

Update:

I entered this vest in the 2022 Topsfield Fair (in Topsfield, MA) and it won both a first place ribbon and Best in Show in the Sewing Division!

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10 responses »

  1. Great work – You did a fantastic job on working through every little step and it’s resulted in a great garment. I love these sorts of post that show all the thought process that goes into a garment – it really show just how much work it is!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks so much! That means a lot. I’m trying to find just the right format and style to be able to talk about all the details without overwhelming people, because you’re right—it’s a lot of work and I want to mention everything that goes into it. Also, if I don’t write it down, eventually I will forget what I did, so it’s a journal entry for myself as well. 😅😂

      Like

  2. Wow! This is a spectacular vest! And thank you for the details with photos. I really appreciate all your hard work both in the sewing and in the documentation. You are very generous with what you have learned. Great job and many thanks.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Just found your blog (from Mill Yardage) and this is gorgeous! I’ve had this pattern for a year trying to decide what fabrics to use. I might have to copy you with the yoke detailing, if that’s ok. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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