Tag Archives: autumn

Sew It Yourself: Elizabeth Suzann Studio Clyde Work Pant

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Sew It Yourself:  Elizabeth Suzann Studio Clyde Work Pant

We pick sewing projects for different reasons–something you need in your wardrobe, putting your own spin on a designer garment you could never afford, using a favorite fabric, the desire to try an intriguing pattern. The Elizabeth Suzann Studio Clyde Work Pant was my intriguing pattern. I had heard of Elizabeth Suzann, a slow-fashion designer, because of Lauren Taylor (known as Lladybird in the sewing community), who had previously worked for her. Many in the sewing community and beyond loved this brand, and there was a lot of buzz when Elizabeth Suzann decided to close her business, but made some of her garments available as sewing patterns for free. Eventually, she wrote directions for the patterns and re-released them with a pay-what-you-can model on her website.

I kept seeing her Clyde Work Pant pattern and was curious about what it would be like to make and how I would like the huge, curving pockets on the sides. They were so different from anything else in my wardrobe, and I never would have been able to afford a pair or have a chance to try them on when they were only available as ready-to-wear. So, having no money for patterns at the time, I took her up on the pay-what-you-can offer, and grabbed a free copy of the pattern.

Sew It Yourself:  Elizabeth Suzann Studio Clyde Work Pant

At the time I wanted to make these, it was August. (I made them before the gingham top I shared a few weeks back.) My husband had given me a gift of enough rust orange linen to make these pants, so I printed the pattern and cut them out. I wasn’t sure if I wanted to make my size or go up a size to make absolutely sure the waist would pull over my hips. In the end, I made a size 16 in the “regular” height, which is where my measurements put me, although I could have gone either way on the height, since I’m about 5′ 8.5″. I also wondered if the ankles would fit over my heels, but I decided to just jump in and see what happened.

Sew It Yourself:  Elizabeth Suzann Studio Clyde Work Pant

The instructions were nice and clear with good illustrations. There was no specific recommendation for how to finish your seams, although if you looked closely at a few of the illustrations, it seemed like the edges were serged. Since I love the look of beautifully finished insides, especially in linen, I chose to use a combination of French and flat-felled seams. While this really did create beautiful insides with not a raw edge in sight, it turned out to be a poor choice for the fabric I was using.

Sew It Yourself:  Elizabeth Suzann Studio Clyde Work Pant
The pants, inside out

I wouldn’t call my linen a loose weave, really, but after wearing these for just a short time, the stitching holes started to open up a little bit and raw edges began to pop out at stress points. This wasn’t because I didn’t do a good job of finishing–it was just that in this fabric with this pattern, the better choice would have been to serge without trimming or zigzag my seam allowances together, press them to the sides in most cases, and topstitch. That would have left my seam allowances intact or at least not super narrow and provided less of a chance for ends and edges to pop out.

Sew It Yourself:  Elizabeth Suzann Studio Clyde Work Pant
Ugh. Edges popped out after only a few wears.
Sew It Yourself:  Elizabeth Suzann Studio Clyde Work Pant

I thought that I would have to start patching my new pants almost immediately, but it seems that just a wide satin stitch has, so far, taken care of the problem, while blending in pretty well. I have the most issues at stress points like the bottom corners of the pockets on the front, the tops of the front seams on the legs, and the right back calf.

Sew It Yourself:  Elizabeth Suzann Studio Clyde Work Pant

The pants were a pretty quick sewing project, and were not too hard to make, which was great. The only part that was a little tricky/fiddly was the waistband. I really like the idea of how the elastic is inserted, but it can be a little tough to do it well. My advice is to go slowly. I also added a few more pins than recommended, in order to keep everything where I wanted it.

Sew It Yourself:  Elizabeth Suzann Studio Clyde Work Pant

Also, the pockets really are huge. I could fit a book in there! They’re so fun.

Sew It Yourself:  Elizabeth Suzann Studio Clyde Work Pant

Sew It Yourself:  Elizabeth Suzann Studio Clyde Work Pant

As for fit, these pants are really interesting. They are definitely comfortable, and I have no trouble getting my waistband over my hips. The rise is really high, which I am guessing might be a way of ensuring that these pants fit many body shapes well, and also makes it possible to wear them at your natural waist or below, as you prefer.

Sew It Yourself:  Elizabeth Suzann Studio Clyde Work Pant

Thankfully, I had no trouble getting the foot holes over my heels, though it’s a close fit.

Sew It Yourself:  Elizabeth Suzann Studio Clyde Work Pant

Standing, these are very comfortable.

Sew It Yourself:  Elizabeth Suzann Studio Clyde Work Pant

Sitting and crouching, I notice that they get more snug around the stress points I mentioned. I suppose that next time I could either size up, or adjust the lower legs to be slightly larger, or try the tall length. I still find them very comfortable, and wonder how they would be in a bottomweight cotton twill or something a bit more durable than the linen I chose.

Sew It Yourself:  Elizabeth Suzann Studio Clyde Work Pant

As for the fabric…I know it didn’t work out perfectly, but…I just love it. It’s a100% midweight linen originally from Fabric Mart. I love the color so much, and it’s not usually a color I go for. It has been great pairing it with a pink linen shirt in summer and now my purple Wool & Honey sweater (pattern by Drea Renee Knits) in fall. It’s so soft and comfortable too. Is it a doomed love? Maybe. I hope these pants last, and I’m not happy that I may have to keep repairing them, but I love this fabric. These pants are agreat transitional garment between seasons.

This was a really fun pattern with wonderful instructions, and even though I made some choices that gave me a few issues, those weren’t the fault of the pattern, which is excellent. In fact, I would love to make them again, despite my poor track record for repeating patterns.

Sew It Yourself:  Elizabeth Suzann Studio Clyde Work Pant

My True Bias Roscoe Blouse in Sweet, Sweet Linen

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My True Bias Roscoe Blouse in Sweet, Sweet Linen

Hi, sewing friends. Today’s project is a simple top with a lot of potential depending on what view you make or what fabric you make it in.

My Roscoe Blouse in some sweet, sweet linen

It’s the Roscoe Blouse from True Bias, a pattern that has proven very popular in the sewing community. It also has mini dress/tunic and dress views built in.

My Roscoe Blouse in some sweet, sweet linen
My Roscoe Blouse in some sweet, sweet linen

I held out for a long time before buying this pattern as I already have a pattern in the same style, but with a different fit (New Look 6472, blogged here). Finally, during a sale at Pintuck & Purl, I saw shopowner Maggie’s silk version, and I went for it and got the pattern for myself.

It’s no secret that I love positive ease, and this pattern has lots of it. The really lovely consequences of that design choice are that it is easy to fit and looks great in a number of drapey fabric substrates. For my first version, I chose to use some midweight “designer quality” linen from Fabric Mart Fabrics that I had originally planned to make into a skirt. I really love this fabric, and it is one that they regularly carry (although the color I used is currently unavailable), so this is now my second sewing project using it. (My first project was a dress, McCall’s 7774, blogged here.) It is easy to sew, substantial without being heavy, and AMAZING to wear. An added bonus is that the only supplies required are fabric and thread–no interfacing, snaps, buttons, or elastic.

My Roscoe Blouse in some sweet, sweet linen

I made view A, the blouse, in a size 16, even though my hip measurement was a 16/18. I didn’t have to do a broad back adjustment or anything. Yay!!!

My Roscoe Blouse in some sweet, sweet linen
My Roscoe Blouse in some sweet, sweet linen
My Roscoe Blouse in some sweet, sweet linen

It’s so rare that I can just trace a single size and cut it out.

The instructions were clear and easy to read. I chose to finish my edges with French seams, which are so satisfying and beautiful.

My Roscoe Blouse in some sweet, sweet linen

I accidentally put my neckline binding on the wrong way, and ended up topstitching it down on the outside instead of the less visible recommended finish, but I really liked it that way, so I decided to do the same thing on my sleeve bindings.

My Roscoe Blouse in some sweet, sweet linen

It was love at first try-on, although I did put a few stitches in near the bottom of the neckline slit to raise it just a little higher for my own comfort and modesty. I found I liked that better than wearing a camisole underneath.

My Roscoe Blouse in some sweet, sweet linen
My Roscoe Blouse in some sweet, sweet linen
Neckline detail view from inside

Fewer layers also preserved the glorious breeziness of this top, which I first wore on a warm and sunny fall day. I love the look of this best tucked in, and for that I would maybe consider making the shirt even longer to keep it tucked in better, but only maybe, as it’s fairly long already. It’s also very comfortable to wear untucked.

My Roscoe Blouse in some sweet, sweet linen
My Roscoe Blouse in some sweet, sweet linen
My Roscoe Blouse in some sweet, sweet linen
My Roscoe Blouse in some sweet, sweet linen

I can see what the hype is all about with this pattern. It’s a joy to make and to wear.

My Roscoe Blouse in some sweet, sweet linen

The Roscoe is a warm-weather dream in linen with its loose fit and roomy, slightly shortened sleeves, and I suspect that it would also be pretty nice in cooler temperatures with lengthened sleeves in a cozy cotton flannel, although that wouldn’t have the drape of a linen or a rayon. Hm… Maybe some of the drapier wool fabrics? I’d love to try the tunic and dress views as well. All in all, I’m really happy I tried this pattern, and it would be a pleasure to make more versions of it in the future.

My Roscoe Blouse in some sweet, sweet linen

Outside in November

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Outside in November

I love, love, love bright and vibrant colors, but I have to say–I find this fall palette that nature puts on to be so beautiful. Even among the brown grasses and leaves on gray days, there is so much variation and beauty. But don’t worry–there are still a few sunny and bright pictures in here, too. Enjoy!

Outside in November
Outside in November
Outside in November
Outside in November
Outside in November
Outside in November
Outside in November
Outside in November
Outside in November
Outside in November

Outside in October

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Outside in October

It’s the first day of November, but since I don’t have any sewing projects to share this week, here are some of my favorite pictures from October.  I’ve started to notice a few of my photographic ruts, but some things are so beautiful, you have to take pictures of them every year.  😉

Outside in October

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Outside in October

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Outside in October

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Outside in October

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Outside in October

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Outside in October

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Outside in October

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Outside in October

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Outside in October

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Outside in October

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Outside in October

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Outside in October

I’ll be back next week if I have a finished project to share.  I had a few gifts and things for others that I was sewing that won’t make it to the blog, but now I’m back to sewing for myself.  Hopefully I’ll have new projects to share soon.  🙂  Happy fall!

Outside in September

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Outside in September

This month has flown by!  I had to schedule in a little bit of outdoor time at the end to get these pictures.

Being out in nature is one of those things that helps me to quiet down on the inside–in a good way.  It doesn’t always feel necessary to set aside time to be outside and take pictures, but when I do, I realize that I needed it.

I had to work a little harder to find some color amidst the grey, but it’s still there, even if it takes more searching in the fall than in the summer.

Outside in September

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Outside in September

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Outside in September

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Outside in September

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Outside in September

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Outside in September

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Outside in September

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Outside in September

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Outside in September

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Outside in September

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Outside in September

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Outside in September

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Outside in September

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Outside in September

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Outside in September

 

Outside in October

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Outside in October

I thought there wouldn’t be an outside post for October since I had been sick or taking care of sick people nearly all month, but when I looked back through my pictures, I was pleasantly surprised to find that I did have some outdoor photos to share with you.  I may not have gotten out much, but I made the most of it!  Enjoy!

Outside in October

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Outside in October

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Outside in October

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Outside in October

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Outside in October

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Outside in October

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Outside in October

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Outside in October

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Outside in October

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Outside in October

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Outside in October

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Outside in October

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Outside in October

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Outside in October

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I’m Featured on Makery!

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Hi, Readers!  If you read the last post, you’ll know I’m currently entered in a competition called The Refashioners 2015.  The contest closed on Sunday, and now we are all waiting to see who will win.  Along with many other entries, you can see my jacket posted on the Makery blog.  The decision is supposed to be announced on Friday, and I’m really hoping to win!  Win or lose, though, I’m a better seamstress with much more knowledge than I had before the competition (and an awesome jacket).

For anyone who is new, here is the jacket I entered, made out of four men’s button down shirts:

The Refashioners Challenge 2015

Front

The Refashioners Challenge 2015

Back

The Refashioners Challenge 2015

Inner lining, front

The Refashioners Challenge 2015

Inner lining back

The Refashioners Challenge 2015

Front, showing inner lining

To see all the entries, you can look at the Refashioners 2015 Pinterest board here.  Wish me luck!