Tag Archives: Cloud9 Fabrics

Quick and Easy Pajama Pants: McCall’s 3019

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Quick and Easy Pajama Pants: McCall’s 3019

It was time for a quick and easy project, I needed pajama pants, and I had some cozy flannel that had been in my stash long enough.  And when all those things aligned, I finally made myself some soft and cozy pajama pants.

Quick and Easy Pajama Pants:  McCall's 3019

The pattern is out of print (OOP) McCall’s 3019 circa 2000 (easily found on Etsy).  This is my go-to pajama pants pattern for my husband.  It’s a unisex pattern that we got from my mom, and it’s a favorite for its loose fit and POCKETS!  You can use it for pants, shorts, a raglan shirt or a long robe.  So far, all I have used it for is pants.

Quick and Easy Pajama Pants:  McCall's 3019

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Quick and Easy Pajama Pants:  McCall's 3019

The fabric I used is an organic cotton flannel from Cloud9 Fabrics, with a great cloud print on it by artist Eloise Renouf.  I got this fabric a few years ago from Pintuck & Purl, but wasn’t sure what to use it for.  I really wanted to make a shirt out of it, but all I could see when I looked at it was pajamas.  Finally, this year, my need for pajamas and an easy project was so great that I knew it was time to use this fabric for its true purpose:  the coziest flannel pajama pants I have ever owned.

Quick and Easy Pajama Pants:  McCall's 3019

I’m a pretty big bargain shopper, so I usually go for the best quality at the lowest price.  I used to always buy cheap flannel on sale whenever I needed flannel, so this was my first experience with organic cotton flannel (I think…I forget a lot of things…).  And there is a huge difference.  I already knew there was a pretty big quality difference between the flannel I had been buying on super sale at the big box stores and quilt shop flannel, but this organic cotton flannel is the best.  It’s really substantial and soft, and I will admit that for the first few weeks after making these pants, I kept wondering how early I could change into them each night (or afternoon…it gets dark really early in the fall here).

Quick and Easy Pajama Pants:  McCall's 3019

So the pants themselves–this was a quick and easy pattern to sew, as expected.  It only has three pattern pieces:  front leg, back leg, and pocket.  My measurements put me in an extra-large size.  The pattern only covers small, medium, and large, but I tried on the last pair I made my husband, which are a large, and found that they fit fine.  I figured I could cut the large and sew with a 3/8″ seam allowance instead of a 5/8″ seam allowance to give myself a little bit of extra ease, knowing I would actually be fine either way.  This worked out great.  The pants are nice and roomy.  I’m really happy with the fit.

Quick and Easy Pajama Pants:  McCall's 3019

I sewed them with a straight stitch and zigzagged the seam allowances, because I was after SPEED!  I added some elastic to the waist and a little ribbon tab at the back, and I was done!  And now I sleep in cozy bliss whenever these pants aren’t in the wash!  I really do need another pair, but I’ve got enough other projects I want to make that that probably won’t happen.

Quick and Easy Pajama Pants:  McCall's 3019

The fabric has begun to pill a little bit, but it still feels just as soft.  You can see it a bit in this picture of one of the pockets.  It doesn’t affect the feel of the fabric, though.

Quick and Easy Pajama Pants:  McCall's 3019

All in all, this was a great project.  It was a good, quick sew and yielded something that is worn even more than most of my other projects.

Quick and Easy Pajama Pants:  McCall's 3019

I plan to take some time off for Christmas (Merry Christmas!  Happy New Year!).  I don’t know if it will just be a week or two or perhaps a little bit longer, but I should be back in January or maybe early February if I decide to extend the break.  I hope you all have a wonderful holiday and enjoy this first official day of winter (Winter Solstice!), knowing that now the daylight will start coming back.  Yay!

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Queue Jumper: Wiksten Kimono in Denim and Flannel

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Queue Jumper:  Wiksten Kimono in Denim and Flannel

Hi, friends!  I’m back with another sewing project.  Truth be told, I have a few others that have been finished for a little while, but since this one jumped in front of everything else on my sewing list, it seems appropriate for it to jump to the front of my blogging list, too.  😉

The Women’s Kimono Jacket from Wiksten, commonly called the Wiksten Kimono has been pretty popular in the sewing community.  The first version of this pattern, by Jenny Gordy of the sewing pattern company Wiksten, came out in Making Magazine No. 4/Lines.  Since then, Jenny has updated the pattern, adding different lengths and refining the fit, and you can now buy it as a standalone pattern if you don’t have access to that issue of Making.

Queue Jumper:  Wiksten Kimono in Denim and Flannel

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Queue Jumper:  Wiksten Kimono in Denim and Flannel

I wasn’t too sure about the pattern at first, so I followed the #wikstenkimono hashtag on Instagram and got a look at what people were making.  The more I thought about it, the more I realized that this was my kind of jacket, and people reported that they loved the process of sewing it.  When Pintuck & Purl stocked the pattern, I made sure to snap one up.

When contemplating which version to make and what fabric to use, I initially planned to make the mid-length version.  As the weather cooled off, though, I thought maybe I would want the long one to wear over leggings and cozy up in during the cold months.  Most of the versions on Instagram during the time I was trying to make fabric choices were in linen, and I considered using some yellow linen for it, but then I had a thought.  Why not figure out what it was that made me reach for favorite garments in the fall?  Which things did I want to pull on over my t-shirt when I was hanging out at home or meeting with friends to catch up?  Once I asked myself that, I could see I needed to make this jacket cozy.

My first thought was cotton flannel lined with fleece, to get a feel like a fleece-lined flannel shirt.  It might end up looking like a bathrobe, but it seemed like it was a risk worth taking for my first version.  Even if it was only something to wear at home, it would still be a win.  I talked it over with some of the ladies at Pintuck & Purl, and realized that we had some very cozy flannel that no one had tried yet, AND I had already purchased some pink (“Heather”) Cloud9 Tinted Denim that would be GREAT with that flannel.  I was planning to make pants with the Tinted Denim, but this idea struck me as an even better idea.

Queue Jumper:  Wiksten Kimono in Denim and Flannel

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Queue Jumper:  Wiksten Kimono in Denim and Flannel

I was told very firmly that I needed to at least try to pattern match my plaid and that I was going to have to straighten out the grain on the flannel just a bit because it was a plaid that I needed to try to pattern match.  It’s not uncommon for fabric to become off-grain as it goes on the bolt, and while it’s usually not an issue, this was something I should try to put right.  I only offered weak resistance, because I knew they were right.

I took my flannel home and prewashed and dried it, and then my husband and I attempted to pull the fabric on the bias from opposite sides to try to get it back on grain.  I think it worked.  Believe it or not, that was the first time I had ever tried that.

Queue Jumper:  Wiksten Kimono in Denim and Flannel

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Queue Jumper:  Wiksten Kimono in Denim and Flannel

Both the flannel and denim are nice and soft.  The denim is fairly lightweight.  I’ve used it before for these shorts and this shirt (in yellow), and I really love it.  It’s such a nice fabric that ages beautifully, softening up over time.  The flannel is from a company that is new to me, Marcus Fabrics.  This buffalo check comes from their Primo Plaid Flannels:  Classic Tartans line.  So far, I really like it–it’s extra soft.

Queue Jumper:  Wiksten Kimono in Denim and Flannel

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Queue Jumper:  Wiksten Kimono in Denim and Flannel

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Queue Jumper:  Wiksten Kimono in Denim and Flannel

Other than that, I used whatever thread I had lying around (which meant I used three subtly different shades of pink, switching to the next shade when the previous one ran out).  I also tried sew-in interfacing this time (pictured below).  Normally I just use basic fusible Pellon interfacing from Jo-Ann Fabrics, but I got a bunch of Si-Bonne interfacing from an estate sale I went to.  I hadn’t heard of this brand before, and I don’t think it’s around any more.  I put the interfacing in the washer and dryer to preshrink it, and then basted it to the collar pieces by hand (next time I’ll do it by machine).  A lot of people skip the interfacing in the collar, but I wanted to stick close to the pattern as written for my first attempt, with the exception of different pockets on the outside layer.

Queue Jumper:  Wiksten Kimono in Denim and Flannel

The sewing itself wasn’t difficult.  I traced a large and cut the longest version.  I changed my outer pockets to larger ones that extended across each side of the front pieces with an angled top, and I had fun adding extra topstitching to the top and bottom.  My topstitching inspiration came from Helen’s version as well as a fashion image I have of a jacket collar with multiple parallel lines of topstitching.  I lined it with flannel so it would be soft and warm.  I also added the original patch pockets to the inside so the jacket would be reversible and so that no matter which way I wore it, I would have inside and outside pockets.  I am so happy about that decision every time I wear this jacket (and I have worn it most days since I finished it).  I cut the patch pockets on the bias for visual interest and made sure to line them with denim so that they wouldn’t stretch out of shape.  In a perfect world, I probably would have cut the flannel side of the collar on the bias as well, since it would have looked really cool, but I didn’t buy enough for that.

Queue Jumper:  Wiksten Kimono in Denim and Flannel

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Queue Jumper:  Wiksten Kimono in Denim and Flannel

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Queue Jumper:  Wiksten Kimono in Denim and Flannel

I was nervous about the plaid matching, so I decided to try to match the horizontal lines of the plaid at the side seams, which turned out great.  The flannel on the collar was too much for my brain, so that doesn’t really match where it attaches to the body, but because of how the collar folds out to contrast whichever side is on the outside at the time, you don’t really see them together.

Queue Jumper:  Wiksten Kimono in Denim and Flannel

I love how I managed to match things up at the center back collar seam, though!

Queue Jumper:  Wiksten Kimono in Denim and Flannel

When I put this on after I finished sewing it, I looked in the mirror, saw how huge it was…and loved it.  Sometimes I make something oversized and don’t like it, but this is huge, and I LOVE it.  It feels so good to wear, and is so cozy and, in its own genre, is pretty cool.  I’ve worn it with jeans and leggings, both with the sleeves cuffed and un-cuffed, and can definitely see myself making other versions.  I’d love to make the mid-length, and maybe even the short length in a fancier fabric.  The sew-in interfacing makes the collar soft and substantial, perfect for turning up to cover my neck when it’s cold.  I could definitely see making other versions in wool or maybe my original flannel + fleece idea.

Queue Jumper:  Wiksten Kimono in Denim and Flannel

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Queue Jumper:  Wiksten Kimono in Denim and Flannel

If you are new to sewing, and this is a style you like, this would be a great pattern to try.  It’s not too difficult and it’s a pleasure to sew, not to mention you get two garments in one since you can wear it as a reversible garment if you want to.  If you’re not new to sewing and you like this style, I think you’ll like it too.

Queue Jumper:  Wiksten Kimono in Denim and Flannel

Update:  After wearing this for three days and then washing it, I went back and edgestitched/topstitched along the bottom and the outer edge of the collar.  My flannel fabric wanted to roll to the outside, even after having understitched during assembly (I think it’s a looser weave than the denim).  I’m hoping this will help prevent that.  Even so, I love the jacket and have worn it most days since making it.

Sewaholic Thurlow Shorts in Tinted Denim

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Sewaholic Thurlow Shorts in Tinted Denim

Hi, sewing friends, and welcome back to the 2017 Summer Sewing roundup.  I have two more summer sewing projects to share after this one and then it’s time for fall sewing on the blog!  I think next year I might wrap up my summer sewing a little earlier, especially since it feels weird to post summer projects in October.  Maybe it will give those in the southern hemisphere some warm weather inspiration now that it’s spring by you.  🙂

Today’s project is the Thurlow Trousers from Sewaholic Patterns.  I made these shorts in Tinted Denim from Cloud9 Fabrics and I LOVE them.  They are just what I was hoping for.

Thurlow Shorts in Tinted Denim

They are also just the pattern I’ve been searching for.  It’s oddly hard to find a trouser pattern with angled front pockets and back welt pockets (as opposed to no back pockets or faux welt pockets which were the options with these pants).  Luckily this pattern has staying power.  Even though it came out several years ago and the leg shape is a little different from what you often see today, it’s not impossible to change that if you want to.

Thurlow Shorts in Tinted Denim

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Thurlow Shorts in Tinted Denim

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Thurlow Shorts in Tinted Denim

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Thurlow Shorts in Tinted Denim

I really wanted some chino-type shorts in a cotton twill, and since denim is a type of twill, I decided to use the Cloud9 tinted denim in Maize.  Colored denim is not my favorite in general, but (1) I actually LOVE the look of this denim and (2) I have had a strangely hard time finding cotton twill bottomweight fabric in a color that I like and at a price I can afford.  While this denim isn’t the cheapest, it’s also not a crazy price, and you need less of it for shorts than you do for pants, so it was a good pick.  It also helped that I was able to pick up both pattern and main fabric (and sparkly zipper!) at Pintuck & Purl when I was up there, so: problem solved.  I bought Bemberg rayon from Jo-Ann Fabrics for the pockets and waistband lining.

Thurlow Shorts in Tinted Denim

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Thurlow Shorts in Tinted Denim

I prewashed and dried the denim on hot several times to get any excess dye and shrinkage out.  The fabric did bleed and fade a bit, but in a way that I really like.  (I use Color Grabber sheets to check how much my fabric is bleeding when I prewash.)  I’d also love to try the aqua and pink Tinted Denim at the shop, but there’s only so much time and money, you know?  Maybe next summer.

Thurlow Shorts in Tinted Denim

I had read that this pattern had a lot of pieces, and that was no joke.  It does, including a different right and left front.  As I was tracing my pattern, I could see how much thought and precision went into it, which made me feel hopeful about my final outcome.  Because I’m not a pear shape (which is what Sewaholic patterns are drafted for), my waist was a larger size than my hip measurement.  I decided to go with the waist size and try to fit as I went.  This worked well for me.  I ended up using a larger seam allowance on the sides than the pattern called for.  Other fitting things that were necessary for me were making the shorts tighter over the behind area and looser at the waist, which you can accomplish at the back seam.

Thurlow Shorts in Tinted Denim

One other issue I had was that when fitting the pointed end of the waistband over the fly shield, the fly shield seemed too wide.  I simply folded it in a bit, ironed and stitched it down, but I wonder if maybe I made it extend too far in the first place.

Thurlow Shorts in Tinted Denim

I wanted shorts that were a bit more straight legged than this pattern is, so I took an inch off the outside of each leg, tapering to nothing at the pocket, and a half-inch off each inseam, tapering to nothing at the crotch.  This does throw the hem off slightly, but I decided to ignore that this time and deal with it if I make these again.  Rather than cuffing these shorts, I turned under 1 1/2″ at the hem and then folded in the same amount again for a 1 1/2″ double-turned hem.

Thurlow Shorts in Tinted Denim

The instructions were really clear, and even the welt pockets weren’t too hard.  Mine did fray a bit at the corners after I washed the shorts, but I will chalk that up to inexperience and trust that I’ll improve in my technique over time.

Thurlow Shorts in Tinted Denim

This pattern is obviously very well done, and I really like that it incorporates an alterable center back seam, which is often seen on men’s pants (and really should be seen on women’s as well, if you ask me).  This helps with fitting while sewing, and also allows you to change it up if you gain or lose inches in the future.  I wouldn’t recommend this pattern to a beginner, but if you have some experience under your belt, this is a real winner.

Thurlow Shorts in Tinted Denim

I’m so happy to have some longer shorts that are comfortable and durable, have pockets, and feel great to wear.  I hope to make more of these in the future.  I also recognize that because fitting pants is an area I’m nervous about, I need to keep making pants and shorts so I can gain confidence.

Thurlow Shorts in Tinted Denim

Recommendations

  • If you, too, are looking for trousers with welt pockets and whatnot, there is another recent pattern release along those lines.  Check out the North Point Trousers (PDF only) from Itch to Stitch.  They have single welt back pockets instead of the Thurlow’s double welt back pockets and a leg shape that is more current.  I’ve never tried an Itch to Stitch pattern, but I’ve heard good things.
  • I just tried this Baah yarn for the first time, and it was so amazing!  I don’t think the website does it justice.  Mine was a fluffy pink skein.  It looks like cotton candy without the stickiness!
  • My sister-in-law sent me the Laura Lea Balanced Cookbook, and I’m having a lot of fun trying out the smoothie section.