Tag Archives: color

Outside in Summer

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Outside in Summer

Of the relatively few pictures I took in July, August, and September, here are some favorites.

I’m becoming more and more interested in light, color, and mood/feeling in pictures.  Now the challenge is to learn to capture those things if I can.

Outside in Summer

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Outside in Summer

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Outside in Summer

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Outside in Summer

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Outside in Summer

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Outside in Summer

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Outside in Summer

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Outside in Summer

 

Outside in April

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Outside in April

It feels like the sun, colors, and flowers all finally and truly came out yesterday.  So today’s Outside post is all about flowers and growing things. Finally!

Outside in April

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Outside in April

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Outside in April

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Outside in April

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Outside in April

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Outside in April

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Outside in April

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Outside in April

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Outside in April

And now for several pictures of the same tree…because it’s just so beautiful.

Outside in April

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Outside in April

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Outside in April

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Outside in April

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Outside in April

 

Caveat

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Caveat

ca·ve·at

noun

1. a warning or caution; admonition.
(Thanks, dictionary.com.)
Remember this post about adding little details to enhance your clothing (also known as “flair”)?  Well, I have discovered something very important that other lovers of vintage buttons may already know about if the problem is widespread.  Sometimes washing and drying vintage buttons can change them.
Here are my pants just after I put a new button on:

Caveat

Once broken jeans, renewed!

Here is what happened to that lovely, lovely button after it was washed and dried:

Caveat

There’s just a tiny bit of blue left on the right side.  I’m sure there is some product you could use to recover it–Rustoleum or a Martha Stewart product or something like that.  Realistically, I’ll probably just leave it, because I like the form of the button.  Still, if you have “fix-it” suggestions, maybe I’ll attempt it in the future.

The other item I want to show you are these vintage buttons.  Now, I’ll admit, this pair of pants did say “Dry Clean Only”.  (I often ignore “Dry Clean Only”…)  It’s a great vintage pair of wool pants that had some stains, so I decided to soak them and then air dry them to get the stains out.  Thanks to OxyClean, that worked, but the buttons, which used to be a lovely turquoise like the pants, are sort of…whitish, I guess you could say.  Here they are:

Caveat

This picture makes the pants appear duller than they are.  They are sort of a light and dark turquoise check.  The buttons were along those color lines, too.  I wish I had a before picture, but I’m sure you can get the idea.

So, the long and short of it is, be careful!  Test your buttons first in water, or plan to dry clean, or just be prepared either way for what might happen.  I still plan to use the buttons above, but I’ll have more of an idea of what may happen in the future.  Any vintage button lovers out there?  Are there some principles we should know about concerning vintage buttons?  I would love to have people comment with any knowledge they have in this area as it is fairly new to me.

Color. What’s in Your Paintbox?

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Color.  What’s in Your Paintbox?

Do you ever think that you can’t love non-fiction?  Have you ever thought history should be interesting, but often isn’t?  Maybe you haven’t, but these were thoughts I have had in my adult life.  I tried and failed to read numerous non-fiction books, but hadn’t made it through them.  “I’m only cut out for literature,” I told myself.  And, while I knew I ought to learn more history (art history, American history, world history), it wasn’t very appealing.  Then I picked up this book.

Color: A Natural History of the Palette by Victoria Finlay

Color:  A Natural History of the Palette by Victoria Finlay is a look at where colors have come from throughout history.  Have you ever considered how such ingredients as…PEE…or…BUGS went into colors historically (and still might!)?  You think I’m kidding, but I’m not!  Finlay travelled the world to find out  where we’ve gotten the colors we use to paint, dye fabric, color our Coke.  Wars over color?  Yes.  Danger?  You know it!

Now, I’ll admit it’s been a few years since I’ve read this, and I tend to forget books after a bit, but I always recommend this one.  No one is paying me to say this, and I don’t work for amazon, but it’s an interesting read, one you can most likely find at your library.  It just might convince you to read more history and non-fiction in general.  Hopefully it will inspire you.  Actually, I should reread it myself.