Tag Archives: New Hampshire

The Perfect Summer Cutoffs: Thread Theory Jutland Pants as Boyfriend Jeans

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The Perfect Summer Cutoffs:  Thread Theory Jutland Pants as Boyfriend Jeans

It’s late summer here, and I think it’s time I introduced you to my most-worn shorts of the season.  This year I finally realized that the shorts I’ve been making myself are kind of…well, short.  This may have been obvious to everyone around me, but it really wasn’t obvious to me until I realized that I wanted some longer shorts and only had one pair that I had thrifted.  But I know how to sew, so that’s a problem I can fix!  😀

Thread Theory Jutland Pants as Boyfriend Jeans

Enter what is quickly becoming a favorite pattern not only for my husband (see versions one and two of his cargo pants from this pattern), but also for me (my pants version is here):  Thread Theory’s Jutland Pants pattern.

Thread Theory Jutland Pants as Boyfriend Jeans

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Thread Theory Jutland Pants as Boyfriend Jeans

My husband loves this pattern because he loves cargo pants, but I love this pattern because, for some reason, it fits me!  It doesn’t fit me to the sewing world standard of “perfect fit”.  It fits me in the way women would want a pair of men’s jeans to fit for that authentic “boyfriend jeans” look or in the way that you want a pair of work pants to fit.

Thread Theory Jutland Pants as Boyfriend Jeans

This summer, I dreamed of a pair of long cutoffs that weren’t tight, but were loose and comfortable.  More and more, I realize that I want my summer clothes to be loose and breezy, and my winter clothes to feel like a warm hug.  😉

Thread Theory Jutland Pants as Boyfriend Jeans

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Thread Theory Jutland Pants as Boyfriend Jeans

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Thread Theory Jutland Pants as Boyfriend Jeans

Before our trip out to visit family earlier in the summer, I cut these jeans out of a non-stretch denim that I bought at Fabric Place Basement, and flew through the sewing!  I wanted these done FAST, so I didn’t do much extra top-stitching or any seam finishes beyond zigzagging my seam allowances.  I didn’t even hem them, because I wanted them to look like cutoffs.  I figured that I was making them secure enough to last, but if they showed some fraying and wear and tear, they would have even more of that authentic look.  And let me just say, I LOVE these shorts.  In fact, I have to hold myself back from wearing them every day.

The only thing I did differently from my pants version (besides the length) was to use the actual Jutland Pants back pockets rather than the back pockets from the Ginger Jeans.  I knew that the Jutland Pants back pockets were bigger and more square, but I just wanted to try them to see if I would like them.  And I do!

Thread Theory Jutland Pants as Boyfriend Jeans

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Thread Theory Jutland Pants as Boyfriend Jeans

Another thing I like about these shorts is that you can wear them long or roll them up one or two times, giving you some different options.  I probably wear them rolled up twice most often, but I really like all the different lengths I can achieve.  Now I’m beginning to wonder if they would look good in canvas and if I have enough left over from other Jutland pants I’ve made…

Thread Theory Jutland Pants as Boyfriend Jeans

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Thread Theory Jutland Pants as Boyfriend Jeans

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Thread Theory Jutland Pants as Boyfriend Jeans

That might be a job for next summer, though.

Recommendations

    • After going to New Hampshire’s White Mountains, I would definitely recommend them!  Now I want to go back and go camping!  (You can see my last post for some pictures of our trip.)
    • I just finished listening to the audio version of Willpower:  Rediscovering the Greatest Human Strength by Roy Baumeister and John  Tierney.  It was a really fascinating psychological look at what willpower is and how you can cultivate it in your life.  I think I need to go back and listen through it again.
    • Devon Iott (@missmake on Instagram) does it again!  I’ve got her version of Style Arc’s Josie Hoodie in my head, and now I want to make my own!
    • This video is a little longer than what I usually post, but it was interesting to learn about the “Pros & Cons of Common Fabrics” both for everyday and as far as environmental impact.  I definitely learned some things!
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Outside in August

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Outside in August

This one is coming to you a little later in the day than usual, but that’s because I was on a mini-vacation Wednesday to Thursday and we got back late last night.  I didn’t want to miss the opportunity to share some photos of where we went, because there was so much beautiful outdoor scenery.  Despite the fact that these pictures were all shot on my phone rather than with my DSLR, I think there are still some good ones.  Get ready to vicariously visit the White Mountains of New Hampshire!

The first place we went was Diana’s Bath in the North Conway area of New Hampshire (NH).  It’s a series of little water falls that you can explore and play in.

Outside in August

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Outside in August

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Outside in August

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Outside in August

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Outside in August

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Outside in August

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Outside in August

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Outside in August

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Outside in August

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Outside in August

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Outside in August

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Outside in August

I guess this post could also be sub-titled “Amazing Fungi of New Hampshire”.  There were so many weird and amazing fungi all over the woods!

Next we went over to Lost River Gorge and Boulder Caves in North Woodstock, NH.  With the help of boardwalks built along a river, you can explore the rocks and caves in a way you wouldn’t be able to otherwise.  These pictures don’t do justice to the amazing boardwalk system they have here (which has over 1,000 steps) or the caves you can squeeze through if you so desire.

Outside in August

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Outside in August

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Outside in August

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Outside in August

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Outside in August

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Outside in August

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Outside in August

It was a great trip, and I hope we can go back and explore more one day.  Have you ever been to the White Mountains?  What did you do there?

Breaking News: New Fabric and Yarn Store!!!

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Hi, readers!  If you are local to southern New Hampshire or the North Shore of Massachusetts, you may be interested to hear that we’re going to have a new fabric and yarn store in the area soon.  I was so excited to hear from Laurel of Retromat Vintage that her friend Maggie is opening a brick and mortar store called Pintuck & Purl in Exeter, New Hampshire.  Maggie says she hopes to open by the end of May or beginning of June, but stay posted for updates!

Anyone who sews or knits knows that sourcing materials is one of the most exciting and frustrating parts of making.  There are so many great online shops, but there is no substitute for being able to feel and see the goods in person.  It looks like Maggie will also have classes, so plan a field trip!  You can keep an eye on her blog or facebook page for more information and, to tide you over until she opens, she also has an etsy store.  Hooray for more fabric, yarn, and knowledge!  Good luck, Maggie!

Pintuck & Purl

50 Lincoln Street

Exeter, NH 03833

Field Trip (and a Recipe!): The Friendly Toast

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Today I want to introduce you to a fun and funky restaurant in Portsmouth, NH:  The Friendly Toast.

Field Trip:  The Friendly Toast with Pattern and Branch

I can’t remember how we discovered The Friendly Toast, whether through a recommendation or by stumbling upon it, but it has become a favorite.  We’ve also visited the Cambridge, MA branch, but the Portsmouth incarnation is the one we’ve come to love the most.

The food choices are really creative, as are the drink options.  Today, I ordered Green Eggs and Ham, which was a slice of anadama bread with ham and two poached eggs on top, covered with a creamy herb sauce and served with home fries.  I’m also always tempted by the coconut pancakes which include cashews, shredded coconut, chocolate chips, and a coconut sauce on top.  We’ve even incorporated meals we’ve had there into our own home rotation (see the end of the post for the recipe we came up with).

The food is good, but that’s not the only thing we love about The Friendly Toast.  It has a really eclectic, kitschy, vintage feel to it.  All those crazy signs and oddments you find at antique stores, flea markets, and garage sales?  I think most of them have ended up here.

Field Trip:  The Friendly Toast with Pattern and Branch

Looking for a doll flying a helicopter? Too late–The Friendly Toast got to it first!

The Cambridge branch has the same sort of décor, but it feels a bit more planned out.  You can never feel bored here, because there is so much to look at.  I also find the people that you see at the restaurant very interesting.  It’s an amazing conglomeration of young families, older families, tattooed vintage-lovers, hipsters, baby boomers, and everything in between.  There aren’t many places that appeal to such a wide array of people.

Field Trip: The Friendly Toast with Pattern and Branch

If you ever get the chance to go, may I also recommend buying a loaf of bread?  We nearly always come home with a loaf of their Cayenne Cheddar Bread (but their Anadama is pretty great, too, and it’s a New England favorite).

Field Trip:  The Friendly Toast with Pattern and Branch

Field Trip:  The Friendly Toast with Pattern and Branch

I’ll leave you with our version of a special we once tried at the restaurant:  New England Poutine.  Of course, it’s not quite as good as the original, but it’s close enough to be incorporated as one of our favorites.

New England Poutine (or our best guess)

makes more than four servings (I can’t quite remember how many we got out of it…How big is your appetite?)

Ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 lbs. thin sweet potato fries (not steak fries), frozen, or about two large sweet potatoes*
  • 1 1/2 lbs. thin-sliced potatoes (like shoestring potatoes or small-diced homefries), frozen, or about six small potatoes*
  • 2-15 oz. cans of corned beef hash
  • 8 oz. medium/sharp white cheddar cheese cut into cubes
  • hollandaise sauce (This link takes you to the recipe we use for Blender Hollandaise Sauce–nice, neat, and not too tricky.)
  • 1 bunch of scallions, sliced
  • toast (something like a Cheddar Cayenne or Italian Herb is good, but plain will also work well)

*If buying frozen sweet potato and potato products, see if you can find packages with similar cook times and temperatures.

Directions:

  1. Cook your sweet potato and regular potato fries according to package instructions or at 450 degrees for 20-25 minutes or until done, stirring once.
  2. Meanwhile, warm your corned beef hash over medium heat in a frying pan on the stove, stirring occasionally.
  3. At this point, prep your Hollandaise as much as you are able to, leaving the final steps undone.  If that feels like too much, do the Hollandaise after step 6.
  4. When your potatoes are cooked, plate them according to how much you think each person will eat, putting just a little less than you think they will want on each plate (there is more to add to this plate, so trust me on this).
  5. Next, cover the potatoes with corned beef hash, again just a little less than you might think.
  6. Top this with some chunks of cheese.
  7. Now finish up your hollandaise and pour some over  your potatoes and hash.
  8. Finally, garnish with scallions and serve with the toast of your choice!

Hope you enjoy this recipe.  Now even if you can’t get to the Friendly Toast, you can pretend you’re are eating there.