Tag Archives: Robert Kaufman

The Same, but Different: Two Kalle Shirts in Tiger Print Lawn!

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The Same, but Different:  Two Kalle Shirts in Tiger Print Lawn!

I’m back with two fun shirts–identical, but in different colors–the fraternal twins of the shirt world?

I love a good animal print–not the type of print that looks like animal skin, but a print with pictures of animals, and some of my favorites are tigers and leopards. I have no idea why. There just seems to be a number of cute fabrics out there featuring tigers and leopards.

Kalle shirt in tiger print lawn!

I’m not sure where I first noticed the fabrics I used for my shirts, but my husband got them for me in my two favorite colorways for Christmas and my birthday in 2020. Not only do I have these prints in lawn, last summer I found the same print in a knit jersey. I’m so excited! Its final destiny is yet to be determined.

But back to the fabric at hand! It was designed by Hello! Lucky as part of a collection called Wild and Free for Robert Kaufman, and it’s 100% cotton lawn, 44″ wide, and came from Fabric.com before it shut down (RIP Fabric.com). The pink is “Tigers Orange” and the blue is “Tigers Sunshine”.

Before beginning this project, I had many ideas floating around in my head. I knew I wanted to make the Closet Core Kalle shirt, but should I made two different versions or versions that were the same, but with contrasting plackets, collars, and cuffs, etc., etc.? In the end, I decided to batch sew two of the same version, each in its own color. I have made the cropped Kalle shirt once before in a speckled/splatter paint print lawn and absolutely love it. I wear it a lot and it has served me well, even as I have changed sizes over the years.

Kalle shirt in tiger print lawn!
This is an older version of the pattern before the company changed its name.

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Kalle shirt in tiger print lawn!

For my tiger shirts, I chose to make View A, lengthened by three inches. I made a size 18. Originally I was going to make the band collar pictured in View A, but part way through the process, I decided to switch to the standard collar so that you could see a bit of the fun fabric even if I wore these shirts under sweaters.

Kalle shirt in tiger print lawn!

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Kalle shirt in tiger print lawn!

I gave some thought to pattern matching, but didn’t let myself get too wrapped up in it. That hidden placket, with its accordion folds, would have been a bit of a mind bender.

Kalle shirt in tiger print lawn!
I intentionally didn’t pattern match my pockets so that they would be easier to see.
Kalle shirt in tiger print lawn!

I also forgot to cut out my inner lining for my yokes, but this was fortuitous. If I had cut it out of my tiger fabric, you would have seen some bits of the pattern on the outside. Instead, I cut them out of some scraps of solid pink Cotton + Steel lawn that I had in my stash, which sets off the pattern nicely on the outside.

Kalle shirt in tiger print lawn!

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Kalle shirt in tiger print lawn!

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Kalle shirt in tiger print lawn!
This yoke does look a little darker because of the pink of the lining inside, but I still prefer it to seeing bits of the pattern on the yoke lining.

I found just the right buttons at Joann’s in matching colors in their Slimline collection–great basics that cost about a dollar a card. It was tempting to find something really crazy, but with the hidden placket, you’d never see them, and these buttons really were perfect.

Kalle shirt in tiger print lawn!

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Kalle shirt in tiger print lawn!

In order to batch sew my shirts, I set up both of my machines with different thread colors. Normally I would always sew my buttonholes on my Elna 3005, which is my newer machine. However, I do actually have a buttonhole attachment for my Singer Featherweight. I told myself that now was the time to learn to use it. As with the Featherweight’s instructions, the instruction booklet for the Buttonholer is excellent.

Kalle shirt in tiger print lawn!

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Kalle shirt in tiger print lawn!

It recommended making a little sample of all the different dies and stitch widths and, uncharacteristically, I actually did it! I knew I would never remember what I had done or might want to do in the future otherwise. On my blue shirt, I used the 5/8″ die at a stitch width of four (I think) and went around each buttonhole twice. It worked out really well, and forced me to learn to use my machine more extensively.

Kalle shirt in tiger print lawn!

I didn’t have too much trouble with the sewing, except for getting the interfaced collar stand of the two-piece/standard collar to fit. In the end, I measured down and in by 5/8″ to find out where the ends of the collar stand should touch the edges of the button plackets. Then, I stretched the shirt to fit the collar stand. I had repinned so many times! I finally decided I would rather just stretch to fit and clip the neck edge after sewing.

Kalle shirt in tiger print lawn!

A few other notes I made for myself that may be helpful to you if you are sewing this: at the point that you are sewing your buttonholes on the hidden placket, you should be sewing through two layers of fabric. It’s also a good idea to place your buttonholes slightly to the outside of center since the inner fold is partly taken up when you sew the placket down. And if you are confused on the cuffs, note that the angled part of the cuff should be on the top of the sleeve.

Kalle shirt in tiger print lawn!

Also, you could check out the sewalong on the Closet Core website. It’s a little bit different than the directions at certain points, so if one doesn’t seem clear to you, the other might. I usually find Closet Core instructions really clear and thorough, but anyone can get confused when you are deep in a project or if the instructions don’t explain things in a way that makes sense to you.

Kalle shirt in tiger print lawn!

I cut these shirts out in September of 2022, and sewed them up in October, finishing just as it started to cool off here for fall. I didn’t wear them much, so I put them away for my future self, and was so happy to take them out once spring hit.

Kalle shirt in tiger print lawn!

It’s still pretty cool here, but I have managed to wear each one at least once, and I look forward to wearing them a lot more as the weather gets warmer. Both colors work great with my existing pants and shorts. I’m not a huge pattern repeater, but I’m really glad I came back and made this pattern again. I started with three yards of each fabric, and I have just about half a yard left of each, so while I often struggle to use my off-cuts, I’m pretty happy to have some little scraps of these fabrics left. I love them so much. And I am so very happy with my lovely new tiger shirts.

Kalle shirt in tiger print lawn!

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Peppermint Magazine Peplum Top in Robert Kaufman’s Limerick Linen

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Peppermint Magazine Peplum Top in Robert Kaufman’s Limerick Linen

I didn’t manage to get a lot of sewing done this summer, but I did make a few things! One was the Peplum Top from Peppermint Magazine/In the Folds.

Peppermint Magazine Peplum Top in Robert Kaufman's Limerick Linen

I’ve made this one before, back in 2018 when I made two versions. It’s such a fun shirt and a nice pattern that I wanted to revisit it and see if I could squeeze it out of some Robert Kaufman Limerick Linen scraps I had saved from the time I made my friend a jacket using Simplicity 8172. Oh, this linen! It’s so beautiful and so floaty. I love it.

Peppermint Magazine Peplum Top in Robert Kaufman's Limerick Linen

Before starting, I looked back at my old post to see what changes I had made to the pattern. I used those again: a minor forward shoulder adjustment, and lengthening the top by two inches, although this time I added one of the inches to the bodice and one inch to the peplum. I made size G, and found a surprising error on the pattern. Even though the key to the sizes shows different line styles for sizes G and F, on the printed and assembled PDF, they both look the same. I just had to count up or down to my size to make sure I was on track. It’s very possible this problem has been fixed since I downloaded it, but keep an eye out just in case if your are sewing either of those two sizes.

This fabric is a little shifty to cut, so you need to be careful and go a little bit slowly. This can be an issue while sewing, too, so make sure you stay stitch the front and back neckline before getting started. It’s not a hard fabric to sew–just be aware that it can shift. Handle it carefully, and you’ll be fine.

Peppermint Magazine Peplum Top in Robert Kaufman's Limerick Linen

I tested out various trim options, but in the end, I decided to keep the outside of the top plain to let the linen shine through, although I did use some fun Rifle Paper Co. rayon bias binding I made instead of the facings. After doing the forward shoulder adjustment, I didn’t really want to alter the facings when I had this pretty option I could use instead. I used my serger to finish my other seams, so the inside looks nice and neat.

Peppermint Magazine Peplum Top in Robert Kaufman's Limerick Linen
Peplum Top front–you can see peeks of the bias binding; the quilt in the background was made by my Mom!

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Peppermint Magazine Peplum Top in Robert Kaufman's Limerick Linen
Peplum Top, back

When I finish a garment, unless I really hate it, I usually feel like it’s THE BEST THING EVER and MY NEW FAVORITE and so on and so forth. I loved this when I first made it–and I still do, but wearing it a few times has helped me to see not only its best qualities, but also some that I like less. The pros are that this is a great pattern in beautiful fabric, and it feels like an absolute dream to wear in the summer. It’s cool and breezy and SO GOOD. Another thing that I love is that because it is dartless, it’s also reversible. I love it both ways. Each one is a little different. The parts I like a little less are that at this size, the armholes are a little low, and show my bra. The beautiful volume that allows this to feel so light and breezy also can have a bit of a pregnancy look, especially from the side. That would be different in a drapier fabric like a silk crepe de chine or a rayon challis, but in a fabric with any amount of body, you need to be prepared for volume. In general, I like the volume, but not always.

Peppermint Magazine Peplum Top in Robert Kaufman's Limerick Linen

All that being said, I really do love this top. I think it will look great as the season turns, on those days when it’s cool enough for jeans and a jacket, but still warm enough for a sleeveless or short-sleeved shirt. I had to do a lot of piecing on the peplum to get it out of the small amount of fabric I had, but I made it with only two scraps left over. Man, I love linen!

Last, but not least, guess what? Today is the nine year anniversary of this blog! Wow! It’s great to be able to look back and see how much I have grown as a sewist and craftsman, how much my focus has both narrowed to sewing, and then expanded to making garments in general with the reintroduction of knitting to my crafting skillset. Will shoes be next? Will I ever make a straw hat? Who knows?! Thanks for reading along, though. I really appreciate it. ūüôā

Ginger Jeans Hack Inspired by Meggipeg

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Ginger Jeans Hack Inspired by Meggipeg

Today’s project has been a long time in the¬† making.¬† And the inspiration for it comes totally and completely from an amazing seamstress on the other side of the world:¬† meggipeg.

Ginger Jeans Hack

Ever since I saw her version of a pair of Balmain jeans made from the Jamie jeans pattern by Named, I wanted my own.¬† But, like a lot of projects that I knew were going to take some work, I had to psych myself up.¬† I didn’t own the Jamie Jeans pattern and, like most indie patterns, it wasn’t cheap.¬† I kept thinking about it, and almost committed to buying the pattern before realizing that with just a little more work, I could use a pattern that I already had.¬†¬†And then came the perfect impetus to get going on making my dream a reality:¬† I had signed up for a class.¬† And not just any class, but a choose-your-own-sewing-adventure kind of class where you pick what you want to work on.¬† The time was now.

Class Projects!

All my class projects ready to go!

I¬†had verbally signed up for Lauren Taylor’s (a.k.a. Lladybird’s) Sewing Master Class at Pintuck & Purl way back in May, when I first heard about it.¬† I love seeing all the things that Lauren sews, and I knew it would be a great opportunity to work on some projects that I found intimidating.¬† So, along with a few other projects, I came up with my pants scheme.¬† It was time to finally make some super-cool pants a la meggipeg and Balmain of my own.

However…I didn’t love the idea of figuring out how to fit¬†a new¬†jeans pattern, especially when I also had so many other project supplies to buy, and that’s when I realized:¬† I could use the Ginger Jeans pattern.¬† All I needed to do beyond what I was already going to do was change the front pocket and add front leg seams.¬† I don’t hack patterns much.¬† But this seemed worth the time investment.¬† In addition to the aforementioned changes, I drew up some parallelograms for the sides of the front legs and divided up the back pocket.

Ginger Jeans Hack

 

Ginger Jeans Hack

Adding a seam to the front leg.

Ginger Jeans Hack

Changing the front pocket shape.

I had plans to add zippers to the front of my jeans as well, similar to Papercut Patterns’ Starboard Jeans, but these didn’t make it into the final pants (because I forgot to put them in before doing the pockets).¬† Oh, well!¬† I also contemplated zippers at the bottom of the jeans, but decided against those before beginning.

Ginger Jeans Hack

Ooops!  I forgot the zippers!

I didn’t get a lot done on these in the class, because this was the third of my several projects (not all of which will show up on the blog–sorry), but¬†preparing for the class forced me to make the necessary pattern changes beforehand.¬† It got me going on the¬†pants¬†and I managed to cut out the pattern and get started during class.

Ginger Jeans Hack

Just in case you’re wondering about supplies, I’d love to share.¬† Here’s where everything came from:

Ginger Jeans Hack

I love this vintage sheet as pocket material!

I did one or two things differently on the construction side of these than on my first pair of Ginger Jeans.¬† This time around, I interfaced my waistband (good idea!) and used true topstitching thread (so-so).¬† I do think I’ll interface the waistband in the future, but I might try a different alternative for the topstitching thread.¬† Maybe I’ll use upholstery or button/craft thread, or maybe I just need a bigger needle and different tension on my machine.¬† I had a lot of thread nests with the topstitching thread and it just wasn’t my favorite overall.

Time for less talk and more pictures, right?

Ginger Jeans Hack

 

Ginger Jeans Hack

 

Ginger Jeans Hack

 

Ginger Jeans Hack

 

Ginger Jeans Hack

 

Ginger Jeans Hack

 

Ginger Jeans Hack

 

Ginger Jeans Hack

The pants themselves?¬† I LOVE them!!!!!¬† So far I’ve worn them about five days out of the last two weeks.¬† Yep!¬†¬†I hope I’m not the only one that calculates how many people I’ll see more than once in a week so I can rewear outfits!¬† But even if I am–oh, well!

I love these pants¬†so much.¬† The ease is great, the fit is great, the stretch is great, and the fabric is great.¬† It was definitely worth the effort to make these.¬† Thanks for the idea, meggipeg!¬† I hope you take my emulation of you as a compliment.¬† I’m always impressed with your style.

Ginger Jeans Hack

I even made¬†a flannel shirt to go with it!¬† Stay tuned for more details on that…

Recommendations

  • I really love these Carhartt’s socks.¬† This isn’t an affiliate link or anything (I don’t do those currently.), just some socks I like.¬† I like the colors, and they keep my feet warm without making them sweaty, which means I can wear my Converse All-Stars or moccasin booties without getting numb toes when the weather is cold.
  • Robert Kaufman fabric.¬† I love Robert Kaufman fabric (in fact, I have some of their Mammoth Plaid that¬†I¬†just made¬†into the flannel shirt of my dreams).¬† The fabric is moderately priced and great quality–and they have so many options.
  • The Imagine Gnats online shop.¬† I have a really hard time getting myself to buy fabric online, always preferring to see it in person first, but I have to recommend this shop.¬† The customer service is great and so is the curated fabric selection.¬† I’ve probably ordered twice from here and I have to give owner Rachel Gander props for the extra little sticker and piece of candy she put in my orders and for ending what has felt like an age-long search for the perfect olive green stretch twill.
  • And because candy corn is one of my favorite fall treats, here is a video that shows how candy corn is made:

A New Button-Down Shirt: Butterick 5526

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It is a lovely, lovely thing to sew from a pattern you have made before and made positive fitting changes to.¬† I’m just learning how to fit things to my own body, and¬†I used¬†this pattern (Butterick 5526) for one of my first attempts,¬†making a broad-back adjustment to it before trying¬†a first draft.¬† In making this second shirt, I didn’t change anything.¬† Someday, someday, I will try a swayback adjustment, but since I can wear the shirt comfortably without it (and the fabric pools in my back, where I don’t normally see it), it just doesn’t feel as urgent.

Butterick 5526; Button-down Shirt

Butterick 5526; Button-down Shirt

Butterick 5526; Button-down Shirt

Butterick 5526

Butterick 5526

The real feature of this edition of the shirt is this cool fabric.¬† I got is last summer at Field’s Fabric in Kalamazoo, MI.¬† If I remember correctly¬†it’s from Robert Kaufman fabrics, and is a cotton.¬† Here’s the cool part:¬† it’s not actually purple.¬† It’s a trick on your eye.¬†¬†The fabric is¬†made of red threads woven perpendicularly to blue threads, and your eye sees it as purple.¬† Color theory in action!¬† (For an interesting read on color, page through Josef Albers’ book entitled Interaction of Color.¬† Mind blowing!)¬† The weave also gives the fabric a fascinating effect (I want to say “iridescent”, but that’s not quite right) in the light.

Butterick 5526; Button-down Shirt

I chose to topstitch this shirt in red and used plain red buttons.  I searched high and low for cool, unique buttons, but in the end, these seemed right.

Butterick 5526; Button-down Shirt

In future editions of this shirt, I’d like to use French seams inside, but I was sort of afraid they wouldn’t make it around the curves and I would get lumps.¬† However, Lauren of the blog Lladybird is the one who I copied convinced me to try this pattern after I saw her many versions, and she uses French seams, so I should give it a try, too, perhaps.¬† For now, let’s pretend the insides of my shirt, which I finished with a zigzag stitch and which consequently frayed in the wash, are a “design feature”.

Butterick 5526; Button-down Shirt

And lest you think I’m aiming for the “moody” look in these posts, I’ve been sick all week, and I was still recovering when I took these (and the next few posts’) shots, so it might show.¬† I feel like I have to say this because when I take blog photos now, I always hear my Grandma’s voice in my head telling me to smile.¬† I tried, Grandma!

How about some “in progress” shots?

Butterick 5526 with a broad back adjustment

Butterick 5526 with a broad back adjustment

Butterick 5526; Button-down Shirt

Butterick 5526; Button-down Shirt

I’ve had this shirt done for a while and it’s gotten lots of wear.¬† The color is one I wear often, and the weight of the fabric is really, really nice.¬† It’s more substantial than my gingham version (which is not high quality fabric, really), and it feels like it will hold up a lot longer, too.¬† I love Robert Kaufman fabrics.¬† Even if I’m wrong about this being from them, I still love Robert Kaufman fabrics.

Butterick 5526; Button-down Shirt

Butterick 5526; Button-down Shirt

Butterick 5526; Button-down Shirt

I hope you all have a good weekend.¬† I’m already feeling better than I was yesterday when I took these photos, so that’s hopeful.¬† Now how about some fun recommendations?

  • Thanks to the Thread Theory blog for featuring the Strathcona Henley and Jutland Pants that I made for my husband along with some other amazing things created from their patterns.¬† Check out all the great projects!¬† The coats blew my mind, and I was definitely eyeing the shorts for ideas for the future.
  • Also on the Thread Theory blog, several cool videos on how various sewing items are made.¬† I really liked that the scissors they showed are still largely made by hand, and seeing how pins and needles are made was fascinating.
  • This music video by OK Go is CRAZY (crazy awesome).¬† They always have the best music videos.¬† Do you think they did it in one take?