Tag Archives: spring

Sweater Knitting: Arrowhead Cardigan in Universal Yarn Deluxe Worsted

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Sweater Knitting:  Arrowhead Cardigan in Universal Yarn Deluxe Worsted

Oh, boy, this was a big one! Today’s project is the Arrowhead Cardigan by Anna Cohen for Imperial Stock Ranch, and it took me a long time and a lot of head scratching to figure it out, but I did it!

Sweater Knitting:  Arrowhead Cardigan in Universal Yarn Deluxe Worsted

This cardigan was definitely above my skill level, but I’m happy to say that perseverance paid off, I learned a ton, I conquered some fears (steeking!), and made it to the finish line. And it fits, which I have struggled with in the past.

Sweater Knitting:  Arrowhead Cardigan in Universal Yarn Deluxe Worsted

Now for the details!

The Yarn

Sweaters are a big undertaking when it comes to finding and choosing yarn, especially if you want to watch your costs. Plainly put, it’s expensive to knit a sweater. Yarn cost is always a factor for me, especially on larger projects. Thankfully, there is a wide range of yarn and price points, if you are willing to dig a bit. And I love the digging–it’s like a treasure hunt.

I found what I was after online at WEBS (yarn.com) in the closeout section. Univeral Yarn Deluxe Worsted offered some bright colors in a 100% wool yarn (non-superwash, worsted spun) at a great price. Reviews were a bit mixed, but I decided to take the risk. My skin isn’t super sensitive to wool and I planned to wear this over a shirt.

I ordered three skeins of “Blushing Bride” (pink) and seven skeins of “Strip Light Yellow”. With shipping, my cost was around $50. That’s more than I like to spend on fabric for a sewing project, but for a sweater, that’s really economical. When the yarn came, it looked and felt great. Before ordering, I had done my best to determine if the colors were far enough apart in value (gray scale) that they would stand out distinctly, and they were. In person, they were just as good.

The Pattern + Knitting

I was really struck by this pattern when I saw it. The design was beautiful and it looked oversized and cozy in all the best ways. I looked at others’ projects on Ravelry and really liked the sweater in different colors as well. Also, I have to admit the original styling for the pattern was right up my alley, and it didn’t hurt that I knit most of this while watching the first 13 seasons of Heartland (a Canadian show set on a horse and cattle ranch) with my daughter. Sometimes I think of this as my “Heartland Cardigan”. All I need is a horse and a farm to go with it! Oh, and a lifetime supply of farming knowledge. You know, the little things. ๐Ÿ˜‰

Sweater Knitting:  Arrowhead Cardigan in Universal Yarn Deluxe Worsted

My gauge came out pretty close to correct at about 17 stitches and 16/16.5 rounds over 4″ x 4″ (the pattern calls for 17.5 stitches and 21 rounds over 4″ x 4″ (10 cm x 10 cm)). I never worry too much about row gauge since I can change the length of the sweater as I knit. I had already gone down from the suggested needle size of US 8 to a US 6, and since I am typically a loose knitter and this sweater has plenty of positive ease, I went down one size as well from the large to the medium. For my body ribbing, I used US 4’s. Since knitting smaller circumferences can tighten your knitting, for my sleeves I went up to US 7’s with US 5’s for the sleeve ribbing. And then I just hoped and prayed it would all work out.

I decided I wanted the pink to be my dominant color (the one that would stand out the most), and after looking through some notes on Ravelry, I decided to catch my floats every 7 stitches. I recolored all my charts so I wouldn’t get confused and knit the wrong color (like I did in one of my Sparks socks), and I made full, colored charts of the sleeves so that I wouldn’t make mistakes there. Those charts took me a long time to color and create, but it was so worth it!

Sweater Knitting:  Arrowhead Cardigan in Universal Yarn Deluxe Worsted
You can see one of my sleeve charts in the background of this picture.

When I tell you this pattern was above my skill level, I’m not kidding. I’ll admit that I am used to using patterns that hold my hand, and I love that. It gives me the confidence to dive into things I have never tried, knowing the help is there for me to figure it all out in the course of the project. There was a lot more assumed knowledge with this pattern, and occasionally I would have to think about a direction or next step for a few days or dig into some knitting books or the internet to figure out how I was supposed to proceed. It meant I made pretty slow progress, but the breaks to puzzle things out ended up paying off each time. I’ll skip the blow by blow description of what I did on each step, but if you could see my copy of this pattern, you would see margins filled with notes.

Sweater Knitting:  Arrowhead Cardigan in Universal Yarn Deluxe Worsted

I have a theory that really, really wanting to make something can carry you through a big project, even if it’s beyond what you have done before. This sweater further solidified that idea in my mind.

An Error

If you take on this sweater, which is a good one, despite the complexity, you should note that there is an error in the medium size instructions. When you begin the body and have to join in the round, the part that says to knit 105 stitches should say 106 stitches. If you don’t change that, you will be short of the 220 stitches you are supposed to have after joining in the round. This will also impact your stitch counts as you go through the pattern. Sometimes you will have to add a stitch, sometimes two, at various points, so keep an eye on that. The charts were fine, by the way, it was just the written directions that were off.

Sweater Knitting:  Arrowhead Cardigan in Universal Yarn Deluxe Worsted

Eek! A Steek!

This sweater is knit from the bottom up as one big tube, with panels of stitches in the areas you will have to open up for the front opening and the armholes.

Sweater Knitting:  Arrowhead Cardigan in Universal Yarn Deluxe Worsted
You can see the steek panels here in the center front and on the tops of the sides.

You open these areas by sewing within that panel (I used my sewing machine) and then cutting down the middle.

Sweater Knitting:  Arrowhead Cardigan in Universal Yarn Deluxe Worsted
The burgundy lines are the zigzag stitches I sewed in the central steek panel. This stitching anchored my knit stitches so the sweater wouldn’t fray when I cut it.

Seems scary, right? And it was, but also exciting. I practiced on my swatch after doing lots of steek research on the internet, and that worked out well.

Sweater Knitting:  Arrowhead Cardigan in Universal Yarn Deluxe Worsted
My gauge swatch/practice swatch
Sweater Knitting:  Arrowhead Cardigan in Universal Yarn Deluxe Worsted
I protected the back side of my sweater with a piece of cardboard between the layers.

It’s such a crazy idea to cut your knitting, but it really works!

Sweater Knitting:  Arrowhead Cardigan in Universal Yarn Deluxe Worsted
Sweater Knitting:  Arrowhead Cardigan in Universal Yarn Deluxe Worsted

After doing that, whether at the front or sleeves, you pick up stitches to knit the sleeves and the ribbing around the front opening, and then later you knit facings to cover the raw edges and the sewing machine stitches. I worried that sewing down my facings would show from the outside, but it didn’t.

Sweater Knitting:  Arrowhead Cardigan in Universal Yarn Deluxe Worsted
The facings are the vertical pink lines at the opening

Since my row gauge was off, I decided to steek the front opening after finishing the body a little before the directions told me to. That way I could try the sweater on and see if my sleeves were at a length I liked before adding the final patterning and ribbing at the wrists and finishing them. Once I had steeked the front, I also blocked what I had to get a better sense of that sleeve length. And I was nervous, because I was not knitting quite as loosely as I had expected, so I just needed to see how things were going.

Sweater Knitting:  Arrowhead Cardigan in Universal Yarn Deluxe Worsted

Doing all of this gave me a lot of helpful information, and I’m so glad I did it.

This is the project where the idea of using lifelines really solidified in my brain as well. I found the shoulder area especially confusing to knit, so before starting, I added some blue pearl cotton to my live stitches in case I messed up and had to rip back. Luckily, I didn’t have to rip back, but it was nice having that security. You can see a bunch of these blue lifelines three pictures up where I had just cut my front steek.

Finishing

I began knitting in August of 2021 and I finally finished my sweater in March of 2022. Seven months! I didn’t work on this non-stop, and usually only put in time while watching TV on a lot of evenings. I’m really happy with how it came out and that it actually fits.

Sweater Knitting:  Arrowhead Cardigan in Universal Yarn Deluxe Worsted
You can change the fit a little depending on how tightly you wrap the front
Sweater Knitting:  Arrowhead Cardigan in Universal Yarn Deluxe Worsted

It’s very interesting, now that I have knit several sweaters that actually fit, to see what I reach for and what fits best in my current wardrobe. I don’t wear this quite as much as I thought I would since it can be a little hard to find pants and shirts to go under it, and I tend to reach for pullover styles more (my purple Wool & Honey sweater is my most-worn sweater by far). It’s very comfortable, though, and I like wearing it. It has pilled somewhat, but the pills are very easy to remove. It is not scratchy unless I am wearing a bag on my shoulder that presses it down, and then it is a little scratchy in that area. I feel like my yarn choice has paid off, however. I love how bright the sweater is, and the amazing designs in it. If you don’t look too closely, it sometimes looks like the sleeves match up with the pattern of the body. They don’t, of course, but it’s easy to think they do initially.

Sweater Knitting:  Arrowhead Cardigan in Universal Yarn Deluxe Worsted
Sweater Knitting:  Arrowhead Cardigan in Universal Yarn Deluxe Worsted
Sweater Knitting:  Arrowhead Cardigan in Universal Yarn Deluxe Worsted

This sweater really stretched me, and taught me a lot. It helped me conquer the fear of steeking, and helped me realize that if I think long enough, and search hard enough, I can find the answers to a lot of knitting questions. This project made me feel like I levelled up, specifically in stranded colorwork, which is my current favorite area of knitting.

Sweater Knitting:  Arrowhead Cardigan in Universal Yarn Deluxe Worsted

Outside in…the Last Six Months

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Outside in…the Last Six Months

Yikes! It’s been six months since my last outside photo post! What happened?!

Let’s play a little catch-up, and look at some of my favorite outside photos of the past six months. (And if you want to see last October’s, it’s actually a “Field Trip” post.)

Here’s November of 2021 through April of 2022. Enjoy!

November

Outside in...the Last Six Months

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Outside in...the Last Six Months

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Outside in...the Last Six Months

December

Outside in...the Last Six Months

January

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Outside in...the Last Six Months

February

Outside in...the Last Six Months

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Outside in...the Last Six Months

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Outside in...the Last Six Months

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Outside in...the Last Six Months

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Outside in...the Last Six Months

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Outside in...the Last Six Months

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Outside in...the Last Six Months

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Outside in...the Last Six Months

March

Outside in...the Last Six Months

April

Outside in...the Last Six Months

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Outside in...the Last Six Months

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Outside in...the Last Six Months

Simplicity 9388 Shirt Jacket in Robert Kaufman Shetland Flannel Speckle

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Simplicity 9388 Shirt Jacket in Robert Kaufman Shetland Flannel Speckle

Today I’m bringing you a pretty popular pattern (and some alliteration, all for free!). Simplicity 9388, a unisex shirt jacket in three lengths, has been well-received in the sewing community since its release.

Simplicity 9388 Shirt Jacket in Robert Kaufman's Shetland Flannel Speckle
Simplicity 9388 Shirt Jacket in Robert Kaufman's Shetland Flannel Speckle
Simplicity 9388 Shirt Jacket in Robert Kaufman's Shetland Flannel Speckle

I like making button up shirts and jackets that aren’t too tricky, so this was on my radar. When I got some Shetland Flannel Speckle in the “Steel” color by Robert Kaufman, it seemed like an ideal match.

Fabric & Notions

This flannel is 95% cotton and 5% polyester. It’s 44″ wide and 6.4 oz/square yard. It’s listed on Robert Kaufman’s site as being 2-ply and therefore “stronger and loftier”. It really is a nice flannel, as all the flannels I have ever used from Robert Kaufman have been. It fluffs up a bit in the wash and, my favorite part, contains little flecks of colors–green, blue, pink, orange, and white.

Simplicity 9388 Shirt Jacket in Robert Kaufman's Shetland Flannel Speckle
Look at those bits of color! Yay!

Mine was a Christmas gift from my husband and came from Amazon. He bought me four yards, and after making this shirt jacket, I have 16″ full width left, plus some odd-shaped extra bits.

You only need a tiny bit of lining for the inside of the yoke, so I looked in my stash and chose a bit of gray cotton lawn by Cotton + Steel. I can’t remember for sure, but I probably bought it at Pintuck & Purl several years ago.

Other than that, I found thread, interfacing, and buttons at Joann’s. I really thought hard on the buttons, spending a lot of time online looking at options, but in the end, Joann’s had just what I wanted. While I had thought something neon or bright would be the ticket, it was this medium pink that looked the best.

Simplicity 9388 Shirt Jacket in Robert Kaufman's Shetland Flannel Speckle

My favorite detail on this shirt is the “L” patch from Wildflower and Company on Etsy.

Simplicity 9388 Shirt Jacket in Robert Kaufman's Shetland Flannel Speckle

This was also a gift, and went great with the shirt. It was easy to iron on and instructions were included to ensure success. After adhering it, I stitched around the outside with regular thread in my bobbin and clear nylon thread in my needle. If you haven’t used nylon thread before, it looks a lot like lightweight fishing line, but comes on a spool. I have a really old spool that was given to me by a friend. This stuff pretty much lasts forever, and is great extra insurance on something like this embroidered patch that will definitely go through the laundry on a regular basis.

I did have one tool failure–and this is something I have seen in several cases, unfortunately. Using a yellow Chaco liner on white/light material is probably a gamble that won’t end well.

Simplicity 9388 Shirt Jacket in Robert Kaufman's Shetland Flannel Speckle

I don’t know if this happens with all the Chaco liner colors, but I have used the yellow on cream fabric and it has never washed out. I helped with a class once where someone made white jeans and couldn’t get it out. Now I notice that I can still see my marks even on this medium gray, even though I have washed it since making it. I absolutely love my yellow Chaco liner for its ease of use, and I really don’t have problems with it on darker colors, but it just doesn’t seem to come out of lighter colors.

Simplicity 9388 Shirt Jacket in Robert Kaufman's Shetland Flannel Speckle
See that yellow streak? It’s not the worst ever, but it will probably never come out.

The Pattern

I chose to make View B in a large for the bust/chest and waist and an extra large for the hips.

Simplicity 9388 Shirt Jacket in Robert Kaufman's Shetland Flannel Speckle
You can see where I graded out a size for the hips on the left edge of the pattern piece.
Simplicity 9388 Shirt Jacket in Robert Kaufman's Shetland Flannel Speckle
Here’s a close-up

I thought about trying the shortest view (View C), but I really wanted hip pockets, and View C omits those.

This pattern was nice to sew without any real surprises, and it felt like it came together fairly quickly. I like the front chest and hip pockets and love how the lining on the inside of the yoke looks.

Simplicity 9388 Shirt Jacket in Robert Kaufman's Shetland Flannel Speckle
Inside front. You can tell I have been wearing this because…wrinkles! haha
Simplicity 9388 Shirt Jacket in Robert Kaufman's Shetland Flannel Speckle
Inside back–love that lined yoke.

One of the few things I didn’t like is that, at this length, the hip pockets finish just above the hem, so if you put your hands or something heavy in the pockets, they will hang down beneath the edge of the jacket. To fix that, I topstitched my pockets to the front, following the seam line from the inside. They aren’t perfectly even, but it’s not noticeable unless you are trying to notice it. While I prefer the look of the jacket without this topstitching, it doesn’t look bad and it completely solves the problem.

Simplicity 9388 Shirt Jacket in Robert Kaufman's Shetland Flannel Speckle
Simplicity 9388 Shirt Jacket in Robert Kaufman's Shetland Flannel Speckle
Pockets! And now that they are topstitched, they don’t hang down!

One thing that was a little different from a lot of shirts that I sew is that this pattern has a one-piece collar and the button plackets extend past the edge of the collar. It give the shirt jacket a slightly different look from a regular shirt. I also like the seam line over the chest pockets. It’s a good detail.

Simplicity 9388 Shirt Jacket in Robert Kaufman's Shetland Flannel Speckle
Simplicity 9388 Shirt Jacket in Robert Kaufman's Shetland Flannel Speckle
Simplicity 9388 Shirt Jacket in Robert Kaufman's Shetland Flannel Speckle

This shirt jacket has, in my opinion, the perfect amount of ease to wear over other shirts or a light sweater, and I could see making this in other cotton flannels or, even better, in wool.

Simplicity 9388 Shirt Jacket in Robert Kaufman's Shetland Flannel Speckle
Simplicity 9388 Shirt Jacket in Robert Kaufman's Shetland Flannel Speckle
Simplicity 9388 Shirt Jacket in Robert Kaufman's Shetland Flannel Speckle
Sewing is so exciting!!!

If you look around on the internet, you can see a lot of versions of this pattern, including an amazing version in red faux fur by Yoga Byrd over on the Minerva.com website (hopefully that link works).

While I started this in the winter (And maybe finished it in the winter? I can’t remember…), it’s a great transitional piece for spring. I have worn it a lot, and am so glad I made it.

Simplicity 9388 Shirt Jacket in Robert Kaufman's Shetland Flannel Speckle
Simplicity 9388 Shirt Jacket in Robert Kaufman's Shetland Flannel Speckle

There’s nothing like a garment you have made yourself when it comes to the ideal fit. And if you find fitting difficult, persevere! You’ll get there! With practice, even if we can’t make everything fit perfectly, we can usually get things closer to what we want than store-bought clothes.

Simplicity 9388 Shirt Jacket in Robert Kaufman's Shetland Flannel Speckle

Fun Sewing-Related Things: Felt Deer Ornament, Maple Leaf Blanket, and Giant Sewing Props

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Fun Sewing-Related Things:  Felt Deer Ornament, Maple Leaf Blanket, and Giant Sewing Props

Hi, everyone! Today I have a few non-clothing sewing items to share with you. I’ve been holding onto them until just the right time, and since I haven’t photographed my most recent garment sewing project, that time is now! Maybe you’ll see something fun you want to try out yourself. ๐Ÿ™‚

Felt Deer Ornament from the Winter Animals Collection by Aimee Ray of little dear

I made this little guy back in January-February (which I only know because I wrote it down!).

Fun Sewing-Related Things:  Maple Leaf Blanket, Felt Deer Ornament, and Giant Sewing Props

He’s embroidered and made of felt. His antlers are stiffened with Mod Podge/glue, a great idea included in the pattern. This is the second animal I have made with a pattern from designer Aimee Ray of little dear, and it was so much fun! This one is from her Winter Animals collection.

Fun Sewing-Related Things:  Maple Leaf Blanket, Felt Deer Ornament, and Giant Sewing Props

Her designs are really cute, and it’s so cool to see them materialize as you follow the directions. I also like that this is a pretty quick project. Even though I made this right after Christmas, I attached a string to make it into an ornament and stashed it with my ornaments for future Christmases. We’ll just say I was planning wayyyy ahead. ๐Ÿ˜‰

Fun Sewing-Related Things:  Maple Leaf Blanket, Felt Deer Ornament, and Giant Sewing Props

The last time I made one of Aimee Ray’s patterns (an opossum), I wanted to use the materials I had on hand–in that case, a felted wool shirt. This time, though, I ordered the felt she uses, which is really beautiful rayon/wool felt from Benzie Design, a store that was new to me. It really is different from the felt I used on school projects or other arts and crafts growing up. You certainly don’t need the higher quality felt, but it was nice to try it out, and one sheet will make a lot of these little guys, since you only use a small amount. Aimee Ray’s animals are a great bet if you want to make a fun and fast craft project. I would love to make more sometime–they would be great Christmas gifts!

Maple Leaf Blanket from the North American Leaf Blanket collection by Twig + Tale

I made another leaf blanket! Are you surprised? I love these things!

Fun Sewing-Related Things:  Maple Leaf Blanket, Felt Deer Ornament, and Giant Sewing Props
Fun Sewing-Related Things:  Maple Leaf Blanket, Felt Deer Ornament, and Giant Sewing Props

This one was a baby gift for a friend back in the spring because New England=Maple trees! After making it, I looked at it and thought that it seemed pretty impractical as a blanket, but I’m happy to report that my friend said those edges that stick out like peninsulas are actually great for wrapping around a little baby. Hooray! As with all the leaf blankets I have made, this one was a pleasure to make.

Fun Sewing-Related Things:  Maple Leaf Blanket, Felt Deer Ornament, and Giant Sewing Props
Guidelines drawn in with chalk before quilting

I love the greens I used–they are quilting cottons from Pintuck & Purl. I have been tempted to buy more of that bright green to use as a photo backdrop for the blog. I love it!

Fun Sewing-Related Things:  Maple Leaf Blanket, Felt Deer Ornament, and Giant Sewing Props
Fun Sewing-Related Things:  Maple Leaf Blanket, Felt Deer Ornament, and Giant Sewing Props
Look at that beautiful green!

Also, now I kind of want a Maple Leaf blanket for me. Up to now, I have made the large Elephant Ear, Banana Leaf, Fan Leaf, and two Monstera leaves all from the Tropical Leaf Collection by Twig + Tale, plus this one from the North American Collection and, uncharacteristically, have only kept one Monstera.

Fun Sewing-Related Things:  Maple Leaf Blanket, Felt Deer Ornament, and Giant Sewing Props
Fun Sewing-Related Things:  Maple Leaf Blanket, Felt Deer Ornament, and Giant Sewing Props

These blankets are graphic in the best sense and more useful than you might think a relatively small blanket would be. We keep our Monstera leaf on our bed and I often use it when just my feet or shoulders get cold.

Giant Sewing Props

This past summer my church asked me to talk to the kids at Vacation Bible School about sewing. That’s right up my alley, so I said yes! I was both really excited and pretty nervous. I’d love to get into teaching more, but since I haven’t done it enough in a sewing context to get into any sort of rhythm, I still get pretty nervous about it. Anyway…to help me demonstrate the basic skills I wanted to talk about, I made some giant sewing props! Since this was during COVID, it was outside and I had a table between me and the kids, so I wanted something large that would be easier to see than a tiny needle and thread.

I came up with the idea to make a giant spool and needle out of cardboard and duct tape and to use a rope as my thread. It worked out pretty well, and was really fun to use.

Fun Sewing-Related Things:  Maple Leaf Blanket, Felt Deer Ornament, and Giant Sewing Props
Fun Sewing-Related Things:  Maple Leaf Blanket, Felt Deer Ornament, and Giant Sewing Props
Me holding the needle for scale

I also put my art skills to work and made some simple illustrations of the two basic stitches I wanted to talk to the kids about.

Fun Sewing-Related Things:  Maple Leaf Blanket, Felt Deer Ornament, and Giant Sewing Props
Whoops! You can see my other illustration in the background.
Fun Sewing-Related Things:  Maple Leaf Blanket, Felt Deer Ornament, and Giant Sewing Props

Looks like my college drawing classes are still working their magic! Haha.

It was a lot of fun, and even though I was sweating buckets in the sunshine, we talked sewing, and maybe one or two kids will think sewing is cool.

Coming up…

I’m working away over here on some garments that will transition well from summer to fall. I have already sewn some linen pants, and am working on a shirt. After that, I’ll make a dress I hope to wear to an upcoming wedding. Oh! And I’m knitting a sweater, too. These colorful projects have been really inspiring to work on and I look forward to sharing them with you–hopefully soon!

And last but not least, yesterday was my eight-year blog anniversary! It’s been a fun eight years. Thanks for following along!

Have a great weekend!

Spring Outfit Challenge Finale and the Hey June Handmade Seaforth Pants

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Spring Outfit Challenge Finale and the Hey June Handmade Seaforth Pants

It’s the first week of official summer and my Spring Outfit is finished! Hahaha. Let’s just pretend this outfit is still seasonally appropriate where I live, shall we? Let it be noted that I did actually finish the last of it a few days before the end of spring, but it was sadly too late to photograph and write up last week, plus I wasn’t feeling great, so I just didn’t get it to the blog. That means this week, instead of ‘outside in June’ photos, it’s time to wrap up this challenge and move on to some summer sewing! Woohoo!

Spring Outfit Challenge Finale and the Hey June Handmade Seaforth Pants
Just wearing my warm hat and long sleeves in the warm weather…totally normal.

If you have followed this challenge of mine to create a spring outfit (first laid out here), you may be surprised to see a different pants pattern in the title of this post. My initial plan was to make the Folkwear Sailor Pants. However, when the time came to work on the muslin, I read through the directions and realized that these were going to take more than a little time. They are different than normal jeans, and they would benefit from a really detailed muslin where I tried out all the techniques in my test fabric as well as looking at fit. At that point, the weather was warming up, summer sewing was galloping full-speed through my mind, and I just did not want to make these. So I put them on hold. My pattern is traced and my muslin cut out, but they can wait until fall. Maybe I will make them up then.

I have really wanted to make the Seaforth Pants by Hey June Handmade ever since they were released last year, so I bought that pattern and cut them out of some denim-y looking chambray that has been languishing in my stash for the last few years. My goal was to make them fast and hope they would fit. Not only would these complete my spring outfit, they would also be great pants to wear in the summer…more on that in a bit.

First, though, check out my spring outfit! I made it all but the shoes!

Spring Outfit Challenge Finale and the Hey June Handmade Seaforth Pants
Spring Outfit Challenge Finale and the Hey June Handmade Seaforth Pants

Maybe someday I’ll make shoes too, but for now, it was Keds to the rescue. In a perfect world, I would have sought out some oceanside wharf or something to take my pictures at since this outfit is nautical-ish in my mind, but instead you get some occasionally silly pictures closer to home.

Spring Outfit Challenge Finale and the Hey June Handmade Seaforth Pants
One of the aforementioned silly pictures. I think we were joking about Funny Face or something at that point.

Here are the patterns, yarn, and fabric I used from top to bottom. You can find more details on notions and small odds and ends in previous blog posts where I talk about each pattern in greater detail.

+ The Oslo Hat – Mohair Edition by Petite Knit

-mystery yarn that I think is wool plus Farmer’s Daughter Mighty Mo mohair in the color “Stagecoach Mary” from Wool & Co.

+ McCall’s 5303 Sweatshirt circa 1991

Taslan in yellow and Supplex in “Candy” (pink) from The Rain Shed

Spring Outfit Challenge Finale and the Hey June Handmade Seaforth Pants
Spring Outfit Challenge Finale and the Hey June Handmade Seaforth Pants

+ Coco top by Tilly and the Buttons

-Parchment/Black 100% cotton horizontal stripe jersey knit from Fabric Mart Fabrics (sold out)

Spring Outfit Challenge Finale and the Hey June Handmade Seaforth Pants

+ Seaforth Pants (modified) by Hey June Handmade

-old Robert Kaufman Chambray Union Dark Indigo from Pintuck & Purl (sold out)

Spring Outfit Challenge Finale and the Hey June Handmade Seaforth Pants

+ Undergarments

+ Sew It Forward Socks by Ellie & Mac

-old Cotton + Steel cotton/spandex knit from Pintuck & Purl (sold out)

Spring Outfit Challenge Finale and the Hey June Handmade Seaforth Pants

I really like how this outfit turned out, and I think I will get a lot of wear out of most pieces. If I had to guess, I would say that the Oslo Hat and Seaforth Pants will get the most wear, possibly followed by McCall’s 5303. I’m guessing the socks will get the least wear. They are comfortable, but I think I should make them in a slightly stretchier fabric next time or modify the top of the socks since they are somewhat tight on my lower legs. That being said, this is a cool sock pattern and is a thousand times faster than knitting socks.

As far as what I enjoyed making the most, that would have to be the McCall’s 5303 sweatshirt (windbreaker). It was really fun and interesting to make. I loved it. The thing I had the least fun making was The Oslo Hat. It wasn’t hard–just boring to knit. If you’re looking for a pattern with lots of stockinette, so you can just knit without too much thought, though, this might be the pattern for you.

I really enjoyed doing a big coordinated project, and it definitely got me inspired and excited to get sewing. I don’t plan on doing this every season, but it was really fun to do at least once.

The Seaforth Pants by Hey June Handmade

Let’s talk in a little more detail about these pants since this is the first time they are making it to the blog.

Spring Outfit Challenge Finale and the Hey June Handmade Seaforth Pants
Spring Outfit Challenge Finale and the Hey June Handmade Seaforth Pants

Like I said, I have been wanting to make these pants for awhile.

Spring Outfit Challenge Finale and the Hey June Handmade Seaforth Pants

When I saw the post on the Hey June blog where Adrianna, the designer, modified the pattern and made a pair of straight leg pants, I was sold.

Spring Outfit Challenge Finale and the Hey June Handmade Seaforth Pants

It was an easy modification, I already had fabric I could use, and I thought I could finish these much faster than the Sailor Pants I had first planned to make. Added benefits were that I could skip the muslin, I could use these pants in the summer, and they would help me get an idea about how the crotch curve from this company fits me, since I also plan to make the Vero Beach shorts in the near future.

I have challenged myself this month to sew at least thirty minutes a day, six days a week, so I used one day to prep my pattern, another to cut it out, and then it was on to sewing. All of these things took longer than the thirty minutes (and sewing took several days), but that goal really helped me get moving.

I followed Adrianna’s instructions for the modified pants and also swapped the front pockets out for some patch pockets from Simplicity 8841, which I have traced onto stiff cardboard with directions glued on the back.

Spring Outfit Challenge Finale and the Hey June Handmade Seaforth Pants
Spring Outfit Challenge Finale and the Hey June Handmade Seaforth Pants

My goal was speed. I’m not the fastest sewer, but I was ready to be done with this project, as fun as it’s been. I used my serger to construct and finish seams and my sewing machine for whatever I couldn’t serge.

Spring Outfit Challenge Finale and the Hey June Handmade Seaforth Pants
Inside view
Spring Outfit Challenge Finale and the Hey June Handmade Seaforth Pants
Back pocket

I added grommets and a drawstring, and I love how they came out.

Spring Outfit Challenge Finale and the Hey June Handmade Seaforth Pants

I did not add the cool bias binding Adrianna mentions in the blog post at the bottom of the pant legs. I might do that another time, though.

One thing worth noting is that when I compared my measurements to the size chart, the size 18 looked just right, and it is what I chose. When you look at the finished measurements, however, the finished hip measurement is an inch smaller than the hip measurement for the size. This made me really nervous and I almost sized up. Adrianna does talk about this and how to pick your size in the directions. After reading through that, I ended up making the 18, and it worked out great. I don’t have any problems pulling the pants over my hips–I never even think about it–but do read that part carefully (and don’t worry too much) if you make these for yourself.

I managed to finish hemming just in time to wear these to an outdoor ceremony we were attending as a family, and they were perfect. The one thing I will do when I make these again, though, is use the front pockets that are part of the pattern. I love the look of the patch pockets I chose, but if you are sitting on the ground, things do tend to fall out.

Spring Outfit Challenge Finale and the Hey June Handmade Seaforth Pants

Something I have learned from the couple of patterns I have sewn from Hey June is that when Adrianna recommends something, whether it’s a certain type of fabric or a certain type of pocket, it’s there for a good reason. I’ve gone off-book here and there and it’s been fine, but I can tell it would have been better if I had followed the recommendations more closely.

Regardless of all that, though, the pants turned out great, the crotch curve works for me, and I am so happy this fabric didn’t become a shirt dress as I had originally intended. I think it will get so much more wear in the form of these pants.

Spring Outfit Challenge Finale and the Hey June Handmade Seaforth Pants

And that’s it! Spring outfit complete! On to summer!

McCall’s 5303 Taslan/Supplex Windbreaker and Spring Outfit Challenge Update

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McCall’s 5303 Taslan/Supplex Windbreaker and Spring Outfit Challenge Update

How’s spring treating you? I’m still chugging along on my spring outfit challenge over here. Today I want to highlight the windbreaker I made! I’ll show pictures of the garments on once I have finished everything, but until then, I’m planning to talk about various patterns as they are finished.

The Pattern

McCall’s 5303 is a pattern from 1991 that is a “Learn to Sew for Fun” pattern.

My Personal Spring Outfit Challenge
McCall's 5303 Taslan/Supplex Windbreaker and Spring Outfit Challenge Update

I made the “sweatshirt”, which I’m calling a windbreaker since I made it out of nylon woven fabrics rather than sweatshirting. I really enjoyed sewing this pattern. I made a large–I am right between the large and extra large in sizing, but I remember the ’90’s and all the positive ease, so after consulting the finished measurements, I found a used copy of the large size and went with that.

The Fabric

The fabric I chose is a woven 7 oz. Taslan (the yellow) and 7 oz. Supplex (the pink). What are these fabrics and what’s the difference between them? Supplex like this is created out of texturized nylon woven together to make a fabric that looks and feels quite a bit like cotton. It’s a popular fabric for outdoor wear because it is breathable, wicking, sun protective, has a durable water repellant (DWR) finish, is quick-drying, etc. Supplex is a brand name and Taslan is the generic version of the same type of fabric. Supplex comes in knits as well, so all those qualities I mentioned apply to this specific type of woven nylon Supplex. This was a fabric that I really wanted to try (I find outdoor technical fabrics really interesting), so I placed a big order from The Rain Shed in January for this fabric in multiple colors with several projects in mind. I do think that the pink fabric has more body and the yellow has more drape. I’m not sure why this is, but it’s interesting to note.

Sewing the Windbreaker

I wondered if Taslan/Supplex would be hard to sew, but it wasn’t. I used a 90/14 microtex needle in my sewing machine and whatever my serger came with (I’m still new at the whole serger thing). It went great. One thing to note about the fabric is that it frays, so you’ll want to finish your seems somehow or other. I was even able to press the fabric on the synthetic setting without a press cloth, but test on scraps first! I’m sure it’s not the same with every iron. Also, this doesn’t press well–you get about the press you would get from finger pressing on cotton, maybe less. Still, it was just enough to help as I was making this.

The pattern instructions were excellent. I would consider myself more of a product sewer than a process sewer, i.e., I want the thing at the end more than wanting to just enjoy every little bit of the making, however I really loved sewing this windbreaker. It was just the right combination of helpful, clear instructions and problem-solving to figure out what I thought the optimal seam finish for each part was. I used several internal flat-felled seams and some serging for the most part. I deviated from the instructions on a few points. For instance, I stitched my pink facings down because I hate having facings that flap around and can catch lint in the washer and dryer, plus I like how it looks on this windbreaker.

McCall's 5303 Taslan/Supplex Windbreaker and Spring Outfit Challenge Update
McCall's 5303 Taslan/Supplex Windbreaker and Spring Outfit Challenge Update

I should note that the instructions tell you to hand baste at multiple points, but don’t let that put you off. I did this for the zipper (always a good idea, I promise) and skipped it in a number of other areas.

McCall's 5303 Taslan/Supplex Windbreaker and Spring Outfit Challenge Update

By the way, basting is a great chance to use more brittle, old thread! I always save my old thread that isn’t strong enough for regular sewing and use it for basting. Also, it looks pretty in a nice jar. ๐Ÿ™‚

McCall's 5303 Taslan/Supplex Windbreaker and Spring Outfit Challenge Update

There is one error in the instructions, however. It relates to putting the drawstring in at the waist. Here’s how to fix it: do not put buttonholes in the front pocket before sewing it on. Sew the pocket on completely and then add the buttonholes through the pocket and the front fabric (treat the two layers as one for the buttonholes). Buttonholes should still be positioned as marked, but they must go through both layers; otherwise, when the bottom edge is folded up to form the casing, you won’t be able to thread the drawstring beyond the pocket area. I didn’t realize this until too late and had to open up my casing and just cut through the front fabric behind the buttonholes, and then drown them in Fray Check. Then I reclosed the casing and called it good enough. It does bug me that there are unfinished cuts that could fray, but they are contained in the casing, so what are you gonna do?

Thoughts on the finished windbreaker?

Well, I have yet to put it to the test in drizzly or rainy weather. I’m expecting it to be water-resistant, not to act as an actual raincoat, but I haven’t tried that out yet.

McCall's 5303 Taslan/Supplex Windbreaker and Spring Outfit Challenge Update
McCall’s 5303 windbreaker (sweatshirt)
McCall's 5303 Taslan/Supplex Windbreaker and Spring Outfit Challenge Update
McCall’s 5303 windbreaker (sweatshirt)

It’s great for slightly cool and windy days, and I love the colors I chose (yellow windbreaker, pink facings and hood lining, and purple zipper).

McCall's 5303 Taslan/Supplex Windbreaker and Spring Outfit Challenge Update

I may replace the white drawstrings with purple paracord to match the zipper at some point…or maybe purple shoelaces. The yellow is quite see-through, so I’m really glad this is meant to go over a shirt or sweater, rather than be a pair of pants or something. I will also have to decide after wearing it more if I would grade the hips out slightly or shorten it overall if I were to make it again. It is a unisex design, so make sure to check the finished measurements on the back of the envelope before sewing this. I found them very helpful, and I would say this fits really well–any tweaking I’m considering is just trying to finesse things rather than solve an actual problem. Overall, I really like this, and I loved sewing it.

Update on my Spring Outfit Challenge

So, now that the windbreaker is done, where does that leave the spring outfit I’m making? Well, as I mentioned previously, I finished my Coco Top

McCall's 5303 Taslan/Supplex Windbreaker and Spring Outfit Challenge Update
Tilly and the Buttons Coco Top, front
McCall's 5303 Taslan/Supplex Windbreaker and Spring Outfit Challenge Update
Tilly and the Buttons Coco Top, back

and my Oslo Hat–Mohair Edition (which I’m currently blocking).

McCall's 5303 Taslan/Supplex Windbreaker and Spring Outfit Challenge Update
Oslo Hat–Mohair Edition, before blocking

More recently, I finished the windbreaker and the Sew It Forward Socks.

McCall's 5303 Taslan/Supplex Windbreaker and Spring Outfit Challenge Update
Sew It Forward Socks
McCall's 5303 Taslan/Supplex Windbreaker and Spring Outfit Challenge Update
Look! I’m a foot model!

I’m currently working on my undergarments (which I won’t be blogging), and then I plan to tackle the Folkwear Sailor Pants! I’m a little nervous about the pants because I know they may need some changes, but I have challenged myself to sew at least 30 minutes every day except Sundays in June, so hopefully that will ward off procrastination. I can feel the pull of summer sewing, so I really want to wrap this up. So far, though, it’s been super fun and has been great for my sewjo.

More next time!

Outside in May

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Outside in May

Hi, everyone! It’s warming up here, and the flowers are really out, so this edition of “Outside in May” is, unsurprisingly, mostly flowers! I’m so happy to see them coming back. Sit back and enjoy some pictures of the great outdoors.

Outside in May
Outside in May
Outside in May
This picture of a robin’s nest is by a guest photographer! (my husband)
Outside in May
Can you spot what I missed when I went to smell these flowers?
Outside in May
Look closer… This moth is so well-camouflaged! It didn’t seem to mind that I was smelling the flowers it was sitting on. Black Locust Tree flowers smell AMAZING.
Outside in May
Outside in May
Outside in May
Outside in May
Outside in May
Outside in May

Happy May! See you next month!

Spring Outfit Progress Report + A Coco Top!

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Spring Outfit Progress Report + A Coco Top!

Hi there! I’m popping in here for a progress report on my spring outfit project and some show-and-tell.

Spring Outfit Challenge Update

At the beginning of spring, I challenged myself to make an outfit that coordinated, and where every part except the shoes were made by me. I’m working away on that over here, and it has been a great challenge. I usually work in batches, but not batches quite this large, and not usually coordinating. This has been really fun and has made me so excited to get creating! Here’s what is happening right now:

All patterns have been traced and cut out.

Spring Outfit Progress Report + A Coco Top!
All patterns traced!
Spring Outfit Progress Report + A Coco Top!
Piles of fabric ready to cut

The plan is still to make a top, pants, undergarments, socks, a windbreaker/pullover/sweatshirt thing, and a knitted hat (even though it’s a bit warm for that now).

Tilly and the Buttons Coco Top

The shirt is finished, and I love it. I modified a Coco Top using inspiration from this picture I found on Pinterest years ago.

Spring Outfit Progress Report + A Coco Top!
I’m not sure of the source of this picture.
Spring Outfit Progress Report + A Coco Top!
My Coco in progress, inspired by the picture above

The Oslo Hat–Mohair Edition from Petite Knit

The hat is in progress. It’s a bit warm to wear it now, but I plan to finish it since I know I’ll wear it next fall and winter. So far, it’s really pretty, really soft, and should be really warm, but…it’s a little boring to knit. Endless knitting of the same stitch in a fingering weight isn’t the most exciting. Oh, well.

Coco Top + A Spring Outfit Progress Report!

Out of Print McCall’s 5303

I’m currently working on the windbreaker using this pattern from 1991. I’m making it in woven Supplex and Taslan. It’s been really enjoyable. I like the colors I picked and the pattern is very interesting and good. It’s just the right amount of hand-holding and problem solving.

Coco Top + A Spring Outfit Progress Report!

Folkwear Patterns 229 Sailor Pants

The pants are cut out of an old sheet so that I can make a muslin before cutting into my denim. Every pattern company has their own block and not every company’s crotch curve fits well without modification. I haven’t tried Folkwear patterns before, so I want to test the pattern before committing. I hope to straighten the legs a bit and potentially lengthen the rise. I want them to fit a bit more like modern 13-button sailor pants, which I have a pair of for reference.

Sew It Forward Socks from Ellie & Mac, etc.

Other than that, socks and undergarments are all cut out and waiting to be sewn.

Spring Outfit Progress Report + A Coco Top!
Cutting out my socks; the funny-looking glove on the bottom is a Kevlar kitchen glove and protects my non-cutting hand from my rotary cutter–it’s one of my best sewing safety hacks ever

I’ll probably tackle those next and save the pants for last. I’m really hoping to have this done with enough time to sew another couple of things while it’s still spring, but I’m not holding my breath. Luckily the other patterns I have my eye on could easily transfer into summer sewing as well.

Coco Top Show-and-Tell

When I originally planned my spring outfit, I decided I would make a Tilly and the Buttons Coco Top in a coral and white lightweight sweater knit. Well, I did that, and then also made the one I mentioned above. Since I’m saving the modified one, I can share the coral and white one now.

Coco Top + A Spring Outfit Progress Report!

The Tilly and the Buttons Coco Top is a quick and easy sewing pattern designed for low stretch knits.

Coco Top + A Spring Outfit Progress Report!
Coco Top + A Spring Outfit Progress Report!

I made this as a top a long time ago in a very stretchy rayon knit and as a dress in ponte, but haven’t used the pattern since. I like to try lots of different patterns, which is exciting, but admittedly not very efficient since I don’t always make a pattern more than once. Anyway, it was nice to circle back around to this pattern. I cut a 7/8 for the bust and waist (I just traced between those two sizes) and an 8 for the hip.

Coco Top + A Spring Outfit Progress Report!

This coral and white sweater knit (60% polyester, 40% cotton, now sold out) is from Fashion Fabrics Club. It’s listed as a sweater knit, but is very lightweight–about the same as a t-shirt. The price was great, and it was easy to sew and is nice to wear. The sewing was pretty straightforward. I changed a few things, such as using my serger for construction and a zigzag stitch for my hems and neckline. The pattern suggests using a twin needle and although I have figured out how to do that on my machine, it tends to unravel over time. I must be doing something wrong, but I usually just skip it now and use a zigzag. I also used a fusible tape in my neckline to help stabilize it.

Coco Top + A Spring Outfit Progress Report!

I’m pretty happy with this shirt! My stripe matching is ok-ish, and that’s fine. The shirt is great for spring, and I like it tucked or untucked.

Coco Top + A Spring Outfit Progress Report!

It was also a good warmup for my second shirt, and a nice quick project to get the sewjo revved up. (Sewjo=sewing mojo) ๐Ÿ˜‰ Every spring, I want all the striped tops, so this is definitely scratching that itch!

I hope to be back soon with another update and more finished projects!

Field Trip in April: Tip Top Tulips!

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Field Trip in April:  Tip Top Tulips!

Spring moves pretty slowly in New England, but it really is here, and with it comes the flowers. Blue skies may be fickle and fleeting, but you can tell everything is coming back to life. It’s so exciting. This month, I went on a field trip (two, actually) to Tip Top Tulips in Ipswich, MA, a place where you can ‘tip-toe through the tulips’ and pick your own bouquet!

I was pretty excited to discover this place. Tip Top Tulips is new this year and has two fields. There is a small field with no entry fee where tulips are $1 a stem. You can keep the bulbs if they come up when you pick the flowers or not–your choice. They may not grow next year, but I kept ours. We’ll put them in the garden in the fall and see what happens.

Field Trip in April:  Tip Top Tulips!
The small tulip field just after it opened.

My kids and I checked this out last week. It was a fun way to pick a bouquet. I gave each of them a budget and turned them loose. The farmers were very helpful and friendly, and we had a great time.

There is also a large tulip field in a different part of Ipswich where admission is $10. Tickets can be purchased on their website. Tulips are also $1 per stem here and you can keep the bulbs if you like.

On Thursday, I went back with a friend to check out the large field. We spent over an hour walking through trying to pick out our favorite flowers.

Field Trip in April:  Tip Top Tulips!
Thanks to the cloudy day, we had the whole field to ourselves a good part of the time. The misty skies were really beautiful.

My plans to only pick five dissolved and I came away with twice as many.

Field Trip in April:  Tip Top Tulips!
I even wore the wooden shoes my parents got me on a visit to the Netherlands when I was a child. They were awesome and still fit! My feet stayed dry and they were easy to walk around the field in.
Field Trip in April:  Tip Top Tulips!

There were some really interesting tulip varieties.

Field Trip in April:  Tip Top Tulips!
Field Trip in April:  Tip Top Tulips!
Field Trip in April:  Tip Top Tulips!

My friend and I had a great time. We sort of forgot to catch up because we spent all of our time exclaiming over the tulips. It was such a nice pick-me-up during COVID, you know? I’m not sure how long they will be open, but if you are near Ipswich and you like tulips, it’s a fun outdoor activity, whether you choose the large or small field.

Sounds like there are plans for a sunflower field in August and a dahlia field in the fall. Fun!

Spring Sweatshirt: Brunswick + Josie

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Spring Sweatshirt:  Brunswick + Josie

Hey! We’re finally into the spring sewing! Granted, I have lots of smaller crafts and knitted items that remain unblogged, but that’s ok. On to spring! This is actually the only garment I have sewn for spring because I’m hard at work on my Spring Outfit! More on that in a future post.

This sweatshirt is made of the softest Tencel sweatshirt fleece EVER.

Spring Sweatshirt:  Brunswick + Josie

I found it at Pintuck & Purl last year, and I bought the last of it. Kali, who works there, even let me buy the little bit she had been saving for herself so I would have enough for my project (thanks, Kali!). I’ve been curious about Tencel, which is a semi-synthetic (like modal, rayon, or lyocell), but which is made with an earth-friendly process by the company Lenzing. I have a thrifted shirt in Tencel, which is drapey like any rayon challis might be, but this sweatshirt knit was a different ballgame. It is drapey, substantial, not overly heavy, so soft, and stretchy.

I got the idea in my head that I wanted to make this fabric into a Brunswick Pullover, a pattern by Hey June Handmade, with a curved hem like that of the Style Arc Josie Hoody.

Spring Sweatshirt:  Brunswick + Josie

I have made both of these patterns before (Brunswick and Josie), and they are two of my very favorite sweatshirts. I’m actually wearing my Josie Hoody as I type this. After checking, I had just barely enough fabric if I chose View A with the hood rather than the cowl neck. The only issue is that the Brunswick is made for heavier weight, lower stretch knits–actually for two-way stretch knits. None of these things describe this black sweatshirt knit. However, Adrianna, the pattern designer, helpfully included fitting notes for anyone who, like me, veered off-script.

Spring Sweatshirt:  Brunswick + Josie

Per her instructions, I sized down from my measurements (which put me at a 20 bust and 22 hip) to the 16 bust and 18 hip I had used previously. It was so helpful that I could try on the Brunswick I already had, which is still a good fit at those sizes. I also took 1/2″ off the bottom sides of the sleeves and 1″ off the width of the cuffs as suggested. Then I added the Josie Hoody hem shape at the bottom of front and back, knowing I might have to work out some issues when I got to the plackets and hem facings.

Spring Sweatshirt:  Brunswick + Josie

For my arm pocket, I cut into one of the two precious fat quarters of Liberty lawn that I own and underlined it by fusing some black silk crepe de chine to it. Fancy! The fusing made things a little on the stiff side, but it was fine in the end, especially after a few wears. I’ve used lawn for pocket bags in pants before and, let me tell you, it is not a good idea. It’s just not durable enough for that kind of wear and tear. This pocket wouldn’t have as much stress on it, but I didn’t like even the smallest possibility of it wearing through in the future, so underlining it was! I didn’t worry about the lawn on the plackets. They’re interfaced where necessary and don’t come under much strain.

Spring Sweatshirt:  Brunswick + Josie
Spring Sweatshirt:  Brunswick + Josie
Spring Sweatshirt:  Brunswick + Josie

Things went along pretty well, even at the spot where the plackets joined my modified hems and when I installed grommets for my hood strings.

Spring Sweatshirt:  Brunswick + Josie
Spring Sweatshirt:  Brunswick + Josie
Spring Sweatshirt:  Brunswick + Josie

The one part I wish I had done differently/better is where the sides of the hood meet in the front. The instructions tell you not to overlap the pieces, but I wonder if I understood it incorrectly. I think they should overlap in the seam allowance and just *kiss* at the seam line (at least in this lighter weight knit). Mine have a gap, so there was probably some user error in there, since Hey June’s instructions have so far proved impeccable.

Spring Sweatshirt:  Brunswick + Josie

I love how this sweatshirt came out. It was worth the crazy hassle to find notions that were color coordinated (why is this so hard?!) and the extra steps to modify the pattern. There is, however, one thing I should have thought about before, but completely missed. It’s not a deal breaker, but here it is. Using a shaped hem with facings actually shortens the sweatshirt from its intended length. The original pattern has you cut the front and back and add a separate piece for the bottom cuff, which adds some length. I didn’t think about that one bit until I put it on at the end. I’m cool with the length it ended up, but if I could travel back in my time machine, I would add the extra length into the body of the sweatshirt.

Spring Sweatshirt:  Brunswick + Josie
Spring Sweatshirt:  Brunswick + Josie

Otherwise, I like it. It has a different feel from a low-stretch sweatshirt. It is drapey, stretchy, and has a pleasant weight that isn’t overpowering. I’ve been wearing it a lot, and it’s only increased my love for these patterns and fabric.

Spring Sweatshirt:  Brunswick + Josie
Spring Sweatshirt:  Brunswick + Josie