Tag Archives: Style Arc

Style Arc Josie Hoody/Hoodie in Polartec Power Stretch

Standard
Style Arc Josie Hoody/Hoodie in Polartec Power Stretch

It’s taken so long for this project to make it to the blog, but here it is:  the Style Arc Josie Hoody/Hoodie in pink Polartec Power Stretch.  (I’m not quite sure how to spell the “hoody” part of the name since my printed copy spells it with a “y” and the PDF on the Style Arc website is spelled with an “ie”.  Either way, it’s the same pattern.)

Style Arc Josie Hoody/Hoodie in Polartec Power Stretch

This sweatshirt is the ultimate in coziness, and a big part of that is fabric choice.  The pattern and fabric were birthday presents from my kids, and I’m so happy that they got them for me.  I fell in love with this pattern when I saw Devon Iott’s version (@missmake on Instagram), and after sleuthing around the internet looking at different iterations, I put it on my wishlist.  Did you know you can buy printed versions of some of Style Arc’s patterns on Amazon?  They come printed on nice, sturdy paper.

Style Arc Josie Hoody/Hoodie in Polartec Power Stretch

l

Style Arc Josie Hoody/Hoodie in Polartec Power Stretch

The fabric is Polartec Power Stretch from Mill Yardage.  For the last few years I have gotten Polartec/Malden Mills brand fleece either at Field’s Fabrics in Kalamazoo, MI or millyardage.com.  When I order from Mill Yardage, I often look at the seconds because, although Polartec has marked them as lower quality, whatever defect they have isn’t obvious, which means great fabric at a lower price.  After trying Power Stretch one year, I fell in love with it for its soft, stretchy fluffiness, which makes it so comfortable.  I thought this color and type of fabric would make a great Josie Hoody.  The only downside is that it can get dirty a little more quickly than a darker color, especially around the cuffs.  So far, any dirt has come out in the wash, though.

Style Arc Josie Hoody/Hoodie in Polartec Power Stretch

When sewing the pattern, I thought I would be really smart and lengthen it and add some pockets.  I wanted to make sure the sweatshirt covered my backside because I had visions of myself wearing this and leggings, all snuggled up inside on a snowy day or going over to a friend’s house for coffee some cold morning dressed in my sporty sweatshirt.  Some of the versions I had seen online were made by people shorter than me, and the fit looked great.  I’m 5′ 8.5″, and I wanted to be fully covered.  I added 4″ to the length, and then I saw a sweatshirt my sister had with pockets!  That seemed brilliant.  Tilly and the Buttons had a free pocket pattern with a little tutorial for adding them and I thought, “I hardly ever hack patterns.  It’s time to up my game a bit and at least start adding pockets to everything.  This will be great.”

It wasn’t great.

The length turned the cool sweatshirt into a sweatshirt dress that didn’t really look cool.  And the pockets gaped, turning my not very cool sweatshirt dress into a cocoon dress (i.e. big hips when that wasn’t what I was going for).  Yikes!  I was down to only scraps of Polartec, so I had to be careful and seam rip the hem facing so I could save it, remove the pockets, sew up the side seams, and cut off the extra length before reapplying the hem facing.  Luckily, all my “super cool pattern hacks” proved to be reversible and, amazingly, the pattern was just great as originally drafted.  Imagine that!  😉

Style Arc Josie Hoody/Hoodie in Polartec Power Stretch

Although I tend to prefer zip-up sweatshirts to over-the-head sweatshirts, this quickly became a favorite.  I love the light color, the feel and squishiness of the fabric, and the style of the pattern.  I did take a little off the top of the hood so that it would fit better, but in a drapier fabric, I might leave it so that the hood stays nice and deep.

Style Arc Josie Hoody/Hoodie in Polartec Power Stretch

l

Style Arc Josie Hoody/Hoodie in Polartec Power Stretch

l

Style Arc Josie Hoody/Hoodie in Polartec Power Stretch

This is my first finished project for my 2018 Make Nine plans, and also my first Style Arc pattern.  I would definitely make this again and hope to use Power Stretch again as well.  For those who like technical details, here they are:

  • I graded from a 12 at the bust to a 16 at the hip, and from a 12 at the armscye to a 16 sleeve as soon as I was able.  I used the size 12 hood.

Style Arc Josie Hoody/Hoodie in Polartec Power Stretch

  • I omitted the drawstring, and didn’t use interfacing.
  • Needles:  stretch 90/14 and double needle (probably stretch)
  • Thread:  top thread–pink cotton-covered polyester (old); bobbin–taupe bulky/woolly nylon
    • Note:  some of my double needle stitches have come undone.  I’m not sure if this is because I used older thread or for some other reason.  I use older thread that’s been given to me all the time and haven’t had any problems so far, so it’s hard to tell if this is the issue.

Style Arc Josie Hoody/Hoodie in Polartec Power Stretch

l

Style Arc Josie Hoody/Hoodie in Polartec Power Stretch

  • Walking foot
  • Light presser foot pressure, normal tension, three-step zigzag stitch (4.5 width, 0.5 length)

This is a great sweatshirt that is quick to make and great to wear.  I definitely recommend it!

Style Arc Josie Hoody/Hoodie in Polartec Power Stretch

l

Style Arc Josie Hoody/Hoodie in Polartec Power Stretch

l

Style Arc Josie Hoody/Hoodie in Polartec Power Stretch

 

 

 

Advertisements

The Perfect Summer Cutoffs: Thread Theory Jutland Pants as Boyfriend Jeans

Standard
The Perfect Summer Cutoffs:  Thread Theory Jutland Pants as Boyfriend Jeans

It’s late summer here, and I think it’s time I introduced you to my most-worn shorts of the season.  This year I finally realized that the shorts I’ve been making myself are kind of…well, short.  This may have been obvious to everyone around me, but it really wasn’t obvious to me until I realized that I wanted some longer shorts and only had one pair that I had thrifted.  But I know how to sew, so that’s a problem I can fix!  😀

Thread Theory Jutland Pants as Boyfriend Jeans

Enter what is quickly becoming a favorite pattern not only for my husband (see versions one and two of his cargo pants from this pattern), but also for me (my pants version is here):  Thread Theory’s Jutland Pants pattern.

Thread Theory Jutland Pants as Boyfriend Jeans

l

Thread Theory Jutland Pants as Boyfriend Jeans

My husband loves this pattern because he loves cargo pants, but I love this pattern because, for some reason, it fits me!  It doesn’t fit me to the sewing world standard of “perfect fit”.  It fits me in the way women would want a pair of men’s jeans to fit for that authentic “boyfriend jeans” look or in the way that you want a pair of work pants to fit.

Thread Theory Jutland Pants as Boyfriend Jeans

This summer, I dreamed of a pair of long cutoffs that weren’t tight, but were loose and comfortable.  More and more, I realize that I want my summer clothes to be loose and breezy, and my winter clothes to feel like a warm hug.  😉

Thread Theory Jutland Pants as Boyfriend Jeans

l

Thread Theory Jutland Pants as Boyfriend Jeans

l

Thread Theory Jutland Pants as Boyfriend Jeans

Before our trip out to visit family earlier in the summer, I cut these jeans out of a non-stretch denim that I bought at Fabric Place Basement, and flew through the sewing!  I wanted these done FAST, so I didn’t do much extra top-stitching or any seam finishes beyond zigzagging my seam allowances.  I didn’t even hem them, because I wanted them to look like cutoffs.  I figured that I was making them secure enough to last, but if they showed some fraying and wear and tear, they would have even more of that authentic look.  And let me just say, I LOVE these shorts.  In fact, I have to hold myself back from wearing them every day.

The only thing I did differently from my pants version (besides the length) was to use the actual Jutland Pants back pockets rather than the back pockets from the Ginger Jeans.  I knew that the Jutland Pants back pockets were bigger and more square, but I just wanted to try them to see if I would like them.  And I do!

Thread Theory Jutland Pants as Boyfriend Jeans

l

Thread Theory Jutland Pants as Boyfriend Jeans

Another thing I like about these shorts is that you can wear them long or roll them up one or two times, giving you some different options.  I probably wear them rolled up twice most often, but I really like all the different lengths I can achieve.  Now I’m beginning to wonder if they would look good in canvas and if I have enough left over from other Jutland pants I’ve made…

Thread Theory Jutland Pants as Boyfriend Jeans

l

Thread Theory Jutland Pants as Boyfriend Jeans

l

Thread Theory Jutland Pants as Boyfriend Jeans

That might be a job for next summer, though.

Recommendations

    • After going to New Hampshire’s White Mountains, I would definitely recommend them!  Now I want to go back and go camping!  (You can see my last post for some pictures of our trip.)
    • I just finished listening to the audio version of Willpower:  Rediscovering the Greatest Human Strength by Roy Baumeister and John  Tierney.  It was a really fascinating psychological look at what willpower is and how you can cultivate it in your life.  I think I need to go back and listen through it again.
    • Devon Iott (@missmake on Instagram) does it again!  I’ve got her version of Style Arc’s Josie Hoodie in my head, and now I want to make my own!
    • This video is a little longer than what I usually post, but it was interesting to learn about the “Pros & Cons of Common Fabrics” both for everyday and as far as environmental impact.  I definitely learned some things!