Tag Archives: Tilly and the Buttons

Style Arc Josie Hoody/Hoodie in Polartec Power Stretch

Standard
Style Arc Josie Hoody/Hoodie in Polartec Power Stretch

It’s taken so long for this project to make it to the blog, but here it is:  the Style Arc Josie Hoody/Hoodie in pink Polartec Power Stretch.  (I’m not quite sure how to spell the “hoody” part of the name since my printed copy spells it with a “y” and the PDF on the Style Arc website is spelled with an “ie”.  Either way, it’s the same pattern.)

Style Arc Josie Hoody/Hoodie in Polartec Power Stretch

This sweatshirt is the ultimate in coziness, and a big part of that is fabric choice.  The pattern and fabric were birthday presents from my kids, and I’m so happy that they got them for me.  I fell in love with this pattern when I saw Devon Iott’s version (@missmake on Instagram), and after sleuthing around the internet looking at different iterations, I put it on my wishlist.  Did you know you can buy printed versions of some of Style Arc’s patterns on Amazon?  They come printed on nice, sturdy paper.

Style Arc Josie Hoody/Hoodie in Polartec Power Stretch

l

Style Arc Josie Hoody/Hoodie in Polartec Power Stretch

The fabric is Polartec Power Stretch from Mill Yardage.  For the last few years I have gotten Polartec/Malden Mills brand fleece either at Field’s Fabrics in Kalamazoo, MI or millyardage.com.  When I order from Mill Yardage, I often look at the seconds because, although Polartec has marked them as lower quality, whatever defect they have isn’t obvious, which means great fabric at a lower price.  After trying Power Stretch one year, I fell in love with it for its soft, stretchy fluffiness, which makes it so comfortable.  I thought this color and type of fabric would make a great Josie Hoody.  The only downside is that it can get dirty a little more quickly than a darker color, especially around the cuffs.  So far, any dirt has come out in the wash, though.

Style Arc Josie Hoody/Hoodie in Polartec Power Stretch

When sewing the pattern, I thought I would be really smart and lengthen it and add some pockets.  I wanted to make sure the sweatshirt covered my backside because I had visions of myself wearing this and leggings, all snuggled up inside on a snowy day or going over to a friend’s house for coffee some cold morning dressed in my sporty sweatshirt.  Some of the versions I had seen online were made by people shorter than me, and the fit looked great.  I’m 5′ 8.5″, and I wanted to be fully covered.  I added 4″ to the length, and then I saw a sweatshirt my sister had with pockets!  That seemed brilliant.  Tilly and the Buttons had a free pocket pattern with a little tutorial for adding them and I thought, “I hardly ever hack patterns.  It’s time to up my game a bit and at least start adding pockets to everything.  This will be great.”

It wasn’t great.

The length turned the cool sweatshirt into a sweatshirt dress that didn’t really look cool.  And the pockets gaped, turning my not very cool sweatshirt dress into a cocoon dress (i.e. big hips when that wasn’t what I was going for).  Yikes!  I was down to only scraps of Polartec, so I had to be careful and seam rip the hem facing so I could save it, remove the pockets, sew up the side seams, and cut off the extra length before reapplying the hem facing.  Luckily, all my “super cool pattern hacks” proved to be reversible and, amazingly, the pattern was just great as originally drafted.  Imagine that!  😉

Style Arc Josie Hoody/Hoodie in Polartec Power Stretch

Although I tend to prefer zip-up sweatshirts to over-the-head sweatshirts, this quickly became a favorite.  I love the light color, the feel and squishiness of the fabric, and the style of the pattern.  I did take a little off the top of the hood so that it would fit better, but in a drapier fabric, I might leave it so that the hood stays nice and deep.

Style Arc Josie Hoody/Hoodie in Polartec Power Stretch

l

Style Arc Josie Hoody/Hoodie in Polartec Power Stretch

l

Style Arc Josie Hoody/Hoodie in Polartec Power Stretch

This is my first finished project for my 2018 Make Nine plans, and also my first Style Arc pattern.  I would definitely make this again and hope to use Power Stretch again as well.  For those who like technical details, here they are:

  • I graded from a 12 at the bust to a 16 at the hip, and from a 12 at the armscye to a 16 sleeve as soon as I was able.  I used the size 12 hood.

Style Arc Josie Hoody/Hoodie in Polartec Power Stretch

  • I omitted the drawstring, and didn’t use interfacing.
  • Needles:  stretch 90/14 and double needle (probably stretch)
  • Thread:  top thread–pink cotton-covered polyester (old); bobbin–taupe bulky/woolly nylon
    • Note:  some of my double needle stitches have come undone.  I’m not sure if this is because I used older thread or for some other reason.  I use older thread that’s been given to me all the time and haven’t had any problems so far, so it’s hard to tell if this is the issue.

Style Arc Josie Hoody/Hoodie in Polartec Power Stretch

l

Style Arc Josie Hoody/Hoodie in Polartec Power Stretch

  • Walking foot
  • Light presser foot pressure, normal tension, three-step zigzag stitch (4.5 width, 0.5 length)

This is a great sweatshirt that is quick to make and great to wear.  I definitely recommend it!

Style Arc Josie Hoody/Hoodie in Polartec Power Stretch

l

Style Arc Josie Hoody/Hoodie in Polartec Power Stretch

l

Style Arc Josie Hoody/Hoodie in Polartec Power Stretch

 

 

 

Advertisements

Tilly and the Buttons Coco Top in Striped Rayon Knit

Standard
Tilly and the Buttons Coco Top in Striped Rayon Knit

Hi, friends!  It’s back to sewing this week.  I have a nice little backlog of sewing projects to share, but the weather hasn’t been cooperating for picture taking.  When the clouds started to brighten on Wednesday, I rushed outside to take pictures of this shirt.

Tilly and the Buttons Coco Top

This is the Coco Top from Tilly and the Buttons.

Tilly and the Buttons Coco Top and Dress

l

Tilly and the Buttons Coco Top and Dress

I made the dress version around the time I began sewing regularly, but I had never made the top.  The fabric came from Haberman Fabrics in Royal Oak, Michigan, and I’ve been holding onto it for over a year trying to figure out the best use for it.  It’s a great substantial rayon jersey that is actually reversible:  blue and white on one side and orange and white on the other.  I really wanted to make a reversible garment, but in the end, the mental gymnastics became too much and I decided to go with a Breton-style shirt where I could incorporate both sides of the fabric.  The Coco pattern was just right since it had the little pocket and it wasn’t hard to color block (stripe block?) the sleeves.

Tilly and the Buttons Coco Top

As far as details, I made the size 5 (Tilly has her own sizing system that is different from other patterns and ready-to-wear) in the long-sleeved shirt view with the pocket.  I used the 3/4 length sleeve line as my color/stripe blocking placement line and just added in seam allowance.  I used a jersey needle and a walking foot as well as polyester thread.  I did try out fusible stay tape for my neckline as suggested, which worked out well.  Instead of zigzagging the neckline, however, I used a twin needle, which I also used on the sleeve edges and bottom hem.  And I opted to zigzag my side seams instead of using a straight stitch.  I used to use a straight stitch on knit seams that weren’t going to stretch a lot, but after wearing those garments for a while, a lot of my stitches popped and I had to resew them with a zigzag, so I went right for the zigzag this time.

Tilly and the Buttons Coco Top

I liked sewing this pattern.  Tilly’s directions are very easy to use, and she includes helpful tips here and there.  Her pictures are really clear, and I’m a big fan of her color scheme, which makes all her images fun to look at.  I would certainly make this again–maybe in the dress version.  🙂

Recommendations

    • I recently watched the movie “Queen of Katwe” about a girl living in poverty who learns to play chess and how it changes her life.  It was excellent.
    • Itch to Stitch just released the free Lago Tank pattern.  It looks like a great basic for summer.  I’ve never tried any patterns from this brand although I’ve been tempted.  This might just be the project to start with.
    • Speaking of free sewing patterns, the Curvy Sewing Collective posted an EXTENSIVE round-up of free patterns with a great size range.
    • And to give you a laugh this week, here is a video that reimagines an important part of the Sleeping Beauty story.  😉

Batch Sewing and a Coco Dress

Standard

After returning from Michigan a month or so ago, I was anxious to start sewing again.  I came back with lots of good fabric from my travels and, since I’m trying to up my sewing game, I decided to try out a different method for getting ready to use that fabric.  Normally I have one or two or even three projects that I’m working on at the same time, but this time, I decided to move several projects through the pipeline together so that I could test out some patterns in preparation for using my “nice” fabric.

I made a big list of all the projects I wanted and needed to do in the near future, and then wrote down the steps I needed to take.  Once I taped those up on my wall and determined which projects could happen now and which would have to wait a bit, I decided to prep all my patterns.  For me, this means tracing out my size and cutting out my traced pattern.  I usually fall into one size at the bust, and a larger size at the waist and hips, so tracing also tends to mean blending two different sizes for tops.  I also want to begin to understand how to fit pants, so I did some research and took a guess at what was needed to make my McCall’s 6848 shorts pattern fit better, and I added those modifications to my already traced pattern.

Once all the tracing, blending, and changing was done on the paper patterns, I cut all my garments out.  I decided to test these patterns out with wearable muslins before making up the winners in my final fabric.  It’s hard for me to take the time to make a muslin, but if I tell myself it’s a wearable muslin, it helps.  Even if I hate the pattern and end up giving the muslin away, it helps somehow.

Then it was on to sewing!  Figuring out what to sew first really showed me:  I love sewing with knits.   Sewing knits is my “low-hanging fruit”–the type of sewing that feels easy and fast.  There’s no seam finishing, no real fitting.  The fabric is forgiving (at least the t-shirt type knits and stable jerseys I was using).  I never understood when I first started sewing why people would make t-shirts when they could buy them so cheaply, but now I get it.  Aside from the allure of making something unique, it’s a quick win that keeps you excited and the other projects moving forward.  That’s why my first three makes from the list were two t-shirts and a knit dress.

After all that wordy build-up, maybe you’d like to see my finished Coco dress!

IMG_9012

I won this pattern during Me Made May ’15 by entering a contest on the blog ‘So, Zo…What do you know?’  The prize was a pattern of your choice by Tilly and the Buttons, and a really cool tote bag with the words “DIY Dressmaker” on it.  I feel cool every time I carry it.  🙂

IMG_9131

IMG_9133

 

I tried out the dress version because…well…because I bought some fabric I would never have bought if I’d had the patience to order a swatch, and I want to use it up while also testing out this pattern.  I thought I had a good idea of what “ponte” fabric was like, so when I saw this go on sale, I ordered it with visions of cool stretchy pants in my mind.  When I got it, it was…polyester-y.  I do not love “polyester-y”.  It was my fault, though.  The site made no misrepresentations as to what the fabric was.  That taught me to be more patient and order a swatch!

When I bought my cool, reversible striped fabric at Haberman Fabric last month, I thought the t-shirt version of this pattern might be a good match for it.  So, I made the dress version thinking I would get a feel for how the pattern fit in the bust and waist section, and I could use up this fabric on a ’60’s style dress that would be a good fit for the mod-looking fabric.

IMG_9005

IMG_9030

IMG_9033

This was a great pattern to work with.  It was easy to put together, and I really like the finished product.  I think the best compliment I got was when someone mistook it for a vintage dress, partly because of the fabric!  Really, though, that compliment belongs to Tilly.  This dress has such a great ’60’s look (well, my idea of the ’60’s anyway–feel free to correct me if you lived it).  It has the wide roll collar and cute cuffs as well as that A-line shift dress thing going on.  I also like where the shoulder seams hit my shoulders.  It’s the perfect spot for me.  It’s very comfortable to wear (partly due to the softness of the fabric, actually).  This pattern did make me realize that I like my A-line dresses and skirts a little longer, despite the fact that a pencil skirt feels comfortable to me at this length.  I think it’s because with an A-line, I can’t always feel the back of the dress or skirt against my legs, and it makes me worry that things are getting exposed back there!

IMG_9021

Here’s what happens when a bee decides he wants to hang out with you while you are shooting pictures.  Or this is how I think people danced in the ’60’s.  You pick.  😉

So, the Coco dress is a win.  Thanks, Tilly!  (Can I just say that she is really nice, too?  I wrote to thank her for the pattern and she wrote back and was so sweet.  You gained a fan, Tilly!)  Her site is great for beginner and more advanced sewists.  She has clear pictures and instructions, a book, etc., etc.  You should check it out if you haven’t already.  The Coco goes back into the pile to be made in other editions.  It’s definitely a contender for the reversible striped fabric I mentioned!

Lastly, a little technical note.  I’m going to start posting my pictures to Flickr instead of keeping them stored in my WordPress media library (I ran out of room and didn’t want to pay for more!).  If you find that a picture is not showing up, please leave me a comment and let me know (there should be seven pictures in this post).  This is new for me and I think I have it figured out, but we’ll see if I’m right or not.  Hopefully I’ve got it because figuring all this out is eating up my sewing time!!!

That’s all for now!  See you next week!